The art of luxurious living in history - Deepstash

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What is a ‘life of luxury’ now?

The art of luxurious living in history

  • In 18th-Century France, a taste for luxurious objects blended with the idea of the art of living. The rise in the power of individualism and new forms of artistry made French elites enjoy the creation of pleasing living environments.
  • In the 19th Century, the demand for luxury goods expanded, as the middle class desired to provide itself with comforts. The industrial revolution allowed for the production of every item they could want. Travel became a major form of luxury.
  • In the 20th Century, luxury became more aspirational due to the expansion of advertising and popular media. By the 1980s, luxury became about purchasing expensive things with only a surface value to gain a competitive advantage in the world.
  • Today, paying attention to the environmental and ethical cost of such consumption, the luxury industry is focusing on personal experiences over personal luxury, and a move away from excess and towards luxury essentialism.

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