Immersion in fictional worlds - Deepstash

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Immersion in fictional worlds allows us to own our dark side | Psyche Ideas

Immersion in fictional worlds

People feel comfortable exploring perspectives in fiction that would be too disturbing in real life.

Studies show that people who possess a specific trait seem more drawn to fictional villains who show the same trait. For example, intelligent participants were drawn to intelligent villains, hot-headed people to hot-headed villains, etc. However, participants were uncomfortable identifying with real-life villains.

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Familiar Traits

Psychologist Carl Jung had once hypothesized that the traits we find irritating in someone else can tell us a lot about ourselves. Many studies have confirmed this insight.

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The Villain Inside Us

New studies show that we tend to like villains who are like us. The researchers analyzed the data of thousands of members, revealing that while we like heroes, the villains who look cool and remind us of ourselves are very well-liked.

These studies pave the way for further investigation and research into our interpersonal relationships being affected by our (and others) positive and negative traits. They also explains why we go on loving our loved ones, even after being fully aware of their flaws.

The hero

Morality matters. People tend to like the good guys and dislike the bad guys.

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Continued comparisons

One study manipulated what characters looked like and measured audience perceptions. They hoped to find out if simple differences in appearance would be enough for viewers to perceive a character as a hero or villain.

The findings indicate that we judge based on comparisons and not because of using an objective standard of morality. Heroes were judged to be more heroic when they appeared after a villain, and villains were judged to be more villainous when they appeared after a hero.

Framing the villain

When an audience sees the evolution of a character whose ethics progressively spiral downward, they don't turn against the character. Instead, they remain loyal to him. especially when the antagonists concurrently get worse with the villain.

It's likely the result of a constant comparison with other characters. It shows the importance of how characters are framed.

Babylon 5

It's a cold-war set in space, with politics aligning towards left of center. It showcases the dangers of nationalism, with great leaders ending up causing enormous damage and harm because of th...

Battlestar Galactica

It's focuses on the survivors of humans in devastated colony worlds. The politics of this series reflect the left-wing reaction to the war on terror, stressing on the significance of democracy and civilian leadership.

The old ‘70s series, and it’s newer remake have, surprisingly different political ideologies, with the same basic story line.

Game Of Thrones

... which is based on George R.R. Martin’s book series "A Song Of Ice And Fire", addresses a range of diverse political issues.

Most of the people hungry for power are showcased as maniacs and reflect on the wrongdoings of global political elites and career politicians.