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What Are Phobias and How Are They Treated?

A person with phobia:

  • feels too much mental and physical anxiety
  • avoids situations where they may come across what they fear
  • suffers personally or professionally in some way. A person with a phobia may turn down a promotion because that job would involve sometimes traveling cross country and they're afraid of flying on an airplane.

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What Are Phobias and How Are They Treated?

What Are Phobias and How Are They Treated?

http://www.brainfacts.org/diseases-and-disorders/mental-health/2018/what-are-phobias-and-how-are-they-treated-071018

brainfacts.org

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Key Ideas

A person with phobia:

  • feels too much mental and physical anxiety
  • avoids situations where they may come across what they fear
  • suffers personally or professionally in some way. A person with a phobia may turn down a promotion because that job would involve sometimes traveling cross country and they're afraid of flying on an airplane.

The phobia center of the brain

There is no one place responsible for phobias in the brain. Many parts of the brain take part. 

However, fear is important to the brain's emotional processing and learning center: known as the amygdala and the hippocampus, with a central role in the process of forming memories.

Treatments for phobias

  1. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (sometimes called psychotherapy) has proved to be the most effective treatment for people with phobias.
  2. Exposure is another part of the treatment. It teaches the brain how to deal with seeing or being close to what the patient fears.

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