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How To Motivate Yourself Into an Exercise Routine You'll Actually Stick To

Wellness is a personal science

Accept advice, but remember you're in this for you—no one else, and you're the only one who'll know what really works. Having an abundance of options isn't a bad thing, but remember who you're in this for.

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How To Motivate Yourself Into an Exercise Routine You'll Actually Stick To

How To Motivate Yourself Into an Exercise Routine You'll Actually Stick To

https://lifehacker.com/how-to-motivate-yourself-into-an-exercise-routine-youll-5950484

lifehacker.com

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Key Ideas

Avoid the "all or nothing" mindset

Exercise doesn't have to be complicated. Doing something is better than doing nothing. Don't let optimal be the enemy of good enough. Do what you can do consistently and worry about optimizing later as you gain traction. 

Wellness is a personal science

Accept advice, but remember you're in this for you—no one else, and you're the only one who'll know what really works. Having an abundance of options isn't a bad thing, but remember who you're in this for.

Whatever you do, enjoy it

Choose something rewarding enough to make you feel good about doing it. If you're having a good time, mistakes feel like learning experiences and challenges to be overcome, not throw-up-your-hands-and-give-up moments.

Use technology for your victories

Use it to see your progress in a way that looking in the mirror won't show you, whether it's on a calendar, in an app, or on a website. But remember, quantifying your efforts is just a method to track your progress. Your tech should be a means of building better habits, not the habit in itself.

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Keeping fit

Everyone is stressed at the moment and are not sleeping well. Exercise can decrease stress and anxiety. Moving will likely improve your sleep.

Who can exercise

  • If you are under 70 with no underlying conditions, you can walk the dog, go for a run or a bike ride, provided you keep your distance.
  • If you are over 70 and self-isolating, or pregnant, or having an underlying health condition but feel well, you can also go outside for exercise while keeping your distance.
  • If you have symptoms, or someone in your household has them, it is essential to use movement and activity while isolating yourself.
  • If you are unwell, use your energy to get better, but not to be active.
  • If you are feeling better after having had the virus, return to your regular routine gradually.

Chair tricep dips

  • Sit on the edge of a chair holding onto the front with your hands.
  • Place your feet out in front of you (bent legs for easier option or straight legs to make it harder)
  • Lower your elbows to a 90-degree angle before pushing back up.

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Eat Meals Earlier 

Don't eat any heavy foods within two hours of bed time. 

If you get too hungry as bedtime creeps around, there are a few foods that are okay to eat before bed, and can even h...

Do Something After You Eat

After you eat, get up and do something a bit more active—even if it's just washing dishes or taking out the trash. It'll avoid that post-meal drowsiness, and it's a great time to have a 10-minute cleaning burst to keep your house looking nice.

Avoid Napping

Napping can make it more difficult to fall asleep at night:

If, after you've thoroughly tested your evening routine and gotten better sleep, you still feel drowsy, you can try adding a power nap to your day, preferably during the early afternoon. 

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Mental Health on the Rise

Mental health issues are on the rise globally, due to a complex life that has us pursue perfection in every aspect of our lives.

Cases of chronic depression and anxiety are normally treated u...

Exercise to treat Depression

Regular exercise can treat mild to moderate depression, as good as the antidepressants.

Exercise provides us with feel-good chemicals made naturally inside our body, as the brain releases endorphins, dopamine, and serotonin.

Exercising for Self-Esteem

Exercise also has a psychological benefit of making us feel great.

Using exercise as a social activity, we improve our self-esteem and get to meet new people, forming healthy and positive connections

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