Maintaining Your Audience's Interest - Deepstash

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The performer's guide to powerful presentations

Maintaining Your Audience's Interest

Now that you’ve captured the audience, you have to maintain their interest. This can take different formats:

  • Problem/Solution: This is commonly used when introducing a product or innovation, using the Monroe Sequence: Draw attention, Establish need, Satisfy need, Visualise future, Take action. You identify the problem as something the audience wants to solve, then present the solution as well as simple ways of implementing the solution.
  • Interaction: This can be embedded into the first approach. You can engage an audience by demonstrating, for example, a thinking bias that you will solve.
  • Gimmicks/Visuals/Props: If you are using PowerPoint, do not read your slides line by line, but use it to enhance rather than make the point. If you are using props - lights and sound can help. Don't act unless you are ready to pull it off, to prevent your audience from feeling embarrassed on your behalf.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

You don’t care enough about the audience

Most people think they are the most important player in a presentation. They are wrong. The audience, the listeners, the people watching the presenter are the most important players.

Care about the audience, creating messages and stories that resonate with them and inspire them.

The Words and the Design

The work on the presentation slides should be clear, crisp, concise, with fewer words and more visually striking simple imagery.

Long sentences and tiny words going through the whole slide are not advisable.

Lack of Practice

Invest your time practicing thoughtfully and getting in a zone where you are a natural.

An effortless-looking presentation makes the audience love it, even though you have toiled hard to make it look effortless.

Popularity of Ted talks
Popularity of Ted talks

TED talks are watched by more than two million times every day. They have become the standard in public speaking and presentation skills.

So probably your next public speech will be compared to a TED talk. But having to raise your game to the TED-style is not a bad thing; adopting some of the techniques that have brought TED speakers global acclaim will make it much more likely that you will persuade your audience to act on your ideas.

Passion leads to mastery

And mastery is the foundation of an extraordinary presentation. So express an enthusiastic, passionate, and meaningful connection to the topic you are presenting in your public speech.

You cannot be an inspiration to your peers if you are inspired yourself.

Tell stories through your presentation

Stories connect us. Stories stimulate and engage the human brain.

Stories help the speaker connect with the audience and make the audience more agreeable with the speaker's point of view.

The Outline/List

Is a linear method of taking notes that proceeds down the page, using indentation or bullets to denote major and minor points.

Pros: it records content relationship in a way that is easy to review.

Cons: difficult to go back and edit information written in this system.

Works for: recording terms, definitions, facts and sequences, when taking notes on slides or readings.

The Sentence Method

The goal is to jot down your thoughts as quickly as possible. Format is kept to a minimum: every new thought is written on a new line. 

Pros: Is like free writing for notes.

Cons: lack organization and notes can be hard to understand.

Works for: meetings or lectures that lack organization; when information is presented very quickly.

SQ3R (Survey, Question, Read, Recite, Review)
  • Skim the material for bolded text, images, summaries, to produce a list of headlines;
  • Each headline is then written in the form of a question;
  • Record your “answers” to the reading questions under each corresponding header;
  • Once you’ve finished reading the text, write a summary of the material from memory—this is the “recite” part of the process. 
  • Finally, review your notes to make sure you’ve completely grasped the concepts.

Works for: dense written material.