Confirmation bias - Deepstash

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Confirmation bias

Confirmation bias

Is the human tendency to seek, interpret and remember information that confirms pre-existing beliefs. 

It affects every choice you make and it all happens in the background without you noticing.

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MORE IDEAS FROM THE SAME ARTICLE

You seek evidence that confirms your beliefs because being wrong feels unpleasant.

Being wrong means you’re not as smart as you thought. So you end up seeking information that confirms what you already know.

To fight back against cognitive biases, you need to evaluate your instinctive reactions.

The next time you run across facts that completely confirm your worldview, stop. Think about the assumptions you’re making and look for ways to prove yourself wrong.

When it comes to information to process, it takes effort to hold opposing hypotheses and try to evaluate evidence for and against each one

So your brain optimizes for the fastest shortcut to a solution. And it’s easier to look for things that support your current belief.

  1. How you seek information - how you look at the world around you
  2. How you interpret the information in front of you - the information you process tends to favour your beliefs
  3. How you remember things - you interpret and possibly even change memories and fac...

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Is the tendency to over-value the effect of small quantitative differences when comparing options.

For example: we think a 1,200 square foot home will make us happier than a 1,000 square foot home. We think earning $70,000 a year will make us happier than earning $60,000 a year.

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Cognitive biases

...are common thinking errors that harm our rational decision-making.

We don't always see things as they are. We don't simply glean information through the senses and act on it; instead, our minds give that info their own spin, which can sometimes be deceptive.

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