An episodic memory - Deepstash

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Why Some Memories Seem Like Movies: 'Time Cells' Discovered In Human Brains

An episodic memory

An episodic memory

If you fall off a bike, you'll probably have a cinematic memory of the experience: the wind in your hair, the pebbles on the road, then the pain.

Researchers have identified cells in the human brain that makes this episodic memory possible. The cells are called time cells that place a sort of time stamp on memories as they are being formed. This allows us to recall sequences of events or experiences in the right order.

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