A belief in Santa does not affect parental trust - Deepstash

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Why children believe (or not) that Santa Claus exists

A belief in Santa does not affect parental trust

Some philosophers and bloggers claim that engaging in the Santa myth can lead to permanent distrust of parents. However, there is no evidence that it affects parental trust in any significant way.

As children's understanding becomes sophisticated, they can engage with the absurdities of Santa, such as how an overweight man can fit through a small chimney.

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