Why children believe (or not) that Santa Claus exists - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

Why children believe (or not) that Santa Claus exists

https://theconversation.com/why-children-believe-or-not-that-santa-claus-exists-70518

theconversation.com

Why children believe (or not) that Santa Claus exists
Most children are not likely to believe that fish live on the moon. What makes children accept some stories and be skeptical about others?

5

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

The Santa Claus story

The Santa Claus story

Studies state that 83 percent of five-year-olds think Santa Claus is real.

Many children are told that Santa Claus is a man who lives forever, lives at the North Pole, knows what every child in the world wants, drives a sleigh pulled by flying reindeer, and climbs through the chimney to get inside your house.

4 SAVES


VIEW

Children will believe anything

Children are prone to believing in just about anything. A sceptical child has less chance of surviving than the child who unthinkingly listens to his parent's advice.

However, research shows that children are rational and thoughtful consumers of information. Children use many of the same tools as adults to decide what to believe.

6 SAVES


Tools to decide what to believe

Adults use three tools to decide what to believe:

  • The context in which you are introduced to new information will guide your judgment to accept it.
  • The tendency to measure new information against existing knowledge.
  • The ability to evaluate the expertise of other people.

Children use the same tools to decide what to believe. When children hear about something in a fantastical context, they are less likely to think it is real than if they heard about it in a scientific context or from a knowledgeable person.

4 SAVES


Why children believe in Santa

Parents and others go to great lengths to overwhelm children with evidence about Santa.

  • 84% of parents report taking their child to visit at least two Santa impersonators during Christmas season.
  • The Elf on the Shelf is now a multi-million-dollar franchise.
  • The United States Postal Service promotes "Letters from Santa" programs which provides personal replies to children's letters.

4 SAVES


A belief in Santa does not affect parental trust

Some philosophers and bloggers claim that engaging in the Santa myth can lead to permanent distrust of parents. However, there is no evidence that it affects parental trust in any significant way.

As children's understanding becomes sophisticated, they can engage with the absurdities of Santa, such as how an overweight man can fit through a small chimney.

4 SAVES


SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

A Child's Mental Health

A Child's Mental Health

Various studies conducted in the U.S. population indicate growing anxiety towards a possibly grim future. Political turmoil, gun violence, global plagues, changing power structure and a widening ri...

Antidepressants And Opioid Epidemic

Pharmaceuticals are playing a major role in the deterioration of mental health among young people. There is a link between teen suicidal thinking and antidepressant use, along with a link being seen in actual suicides among the young and the use of opioids in their families.

Smartphones and Social Media

Across age groups, social media is potentially hazardous, with its tendency to amplify the social divide.

There is a strong relationship between anxiety/depression and the use of smartphones, particularly social media usage among kids, though the data also seem to show the positive effects of staying connected with their peers. Online distractions also make youngsters give up their offline life, leading to isolation and further depression.

11 more ideas

To lie is human

To lie is human
  • Lying is something that most people are very practiced in. We lie in big and small ways, to strangers, co-workers, friends, and loved ones.
  • Researchers found that people lie on ave...

Lying increases with maturity

The increase in lying is driven by the development of the ability to see the world from someone else's perspective. We gain an understanding of the beliefs, intentions, and knowledge of others.

The more we lie, the easier it becomes. Among two-year-olds, only 30 percent are untruthful. Among three-year-olds, 50 percent lie. By eight, kids learn to mask their lying by deliberately giving a wrong answer or making their statement seem like a guess.

Why we limit our lies

We like to see ourselves as honest because we have internalized honesty as a value taught to us. We generally place limits on how much we are willing to lie.

Purpose Is Essential

Purpose Is Essential

Purpose in life leads to greater well-being, hope and provides a sense of meaning in life.

The positive or negative experiences we have as children play an important role in our sense of pur...

Experiencing Adversity

Individuals who experience adversity at an early age have a decreased sense of purpose according to research.

For some, it works in the reverse, with adversity providing them with the 'kick' they need to pursue a particular calling in life.

Experiencing Conflict

Relationship issues with parents lead to a decreased sense of purpose as the young person grows older.

Frequently fighting or arguing with parents drains the child's energy and enthusiasm.