Sticky Tunes: When Songs Become Earworms - Deepstash

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Christmas earworms: the science behind our love-hate relationship with festive songs

Sticky Tunes: When Songs Become Earworms

Sticky Tunes: When Songs Become Earworms
  • The songs that get stuck in our heads, those catchy but often annoying earworms are common, especially the Christmas melodies during the holiday season.
  • New research into these tunes stuck in the brain shows that they are conventional melodies (often instrumental) but have an unexpected repetition/loop, and can even impair our concentration.
  • During the Christmas season, melodic holiday songs play in public places like bars and cafes and are often heard on the radio, leading to a more than usual exposure. These songs have a certain melody that is ‘scrunchy’ and forms a familiar chord known as the Christmas chord, making them prone to become earworms.

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