Improving your idea-flow

Improving your idea-flow

A lower idea-flow is this sense that you don't have as many ideas as you used to. Reading more encourages ideas to flow.

You can't create time, you can only re-allocate it. To find the time for improving your idea-flow means that you have to find ways to cut back on other things.

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Developing good ideas is an active process. The ideas that are starting to form should be coaxed out of you.

  • This is best done by having conversations. It forces you to try to explain them in a moment, realize where they're faulty, then continue refining them in subsequent discussions.
  • Creating is the final expression of an idea. Express your ideas in articles, tweets, songs, paintings, TikToks, to clarify them properly.

One way to improve ideas is to think of sources of information as being in memetic buckets. If your idea inputs come from the same memetic bucket, your outputs will replicate the same concepts in that bucket. Your thoughts won't be new or particularly interesting.

To combat this:

  1. Reduce the overlap in idea sources.
  2. Go through your social media feeds and see what sources say the same things in different ways.
  3. Pick one or two favourites out of them, and ditch the rest.

When you catch yourself thinking "that's crazy," try to figure out why someone would believe that idea.

People are mostly logical, their starting point is just different. When you try to see if you can find the premises for someone's beliefs and ideas, their conclusions will make more sense. Even if you disagree, understanding where they are coming from will help you better understand your own ideas.

Cut your sources of information so you don't hear the same thing in five different ways.

Realize when you should let go of certain inputs, even if you enjoy them.

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

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RELATED IDEAS

The five-hour rule

No matter how busy successful people are, they always spend at least an hour a day (thus five hours a week) learning or practicing. And they do this across their entire career.

Barack Obama is far from the only leader to credit his success to reading. Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, Oprah Winfrey, Elon Musk, Mark Cuban and Jack Ma are all voracious readers. 

Constructing a good argument

At its core, an argument consists of a conclusion and one or more premises, or claims.

  • The conclusion is what the communicator wants his or her audience to accept.
  • The premises are the reasons for believing the conclusion to be true.
  • Create contexts that enable smart decisions: recognize what you’re actually doing when you’re reasoning about things and use this knowledge to try to avoid making common mistakes
  • Absorb lots and lots of knowledge about the world and integrate it through practice making decisions:  more you know about things, the better you can reason about them.
  • ❤️ Brainstash Inc.