Benefits of learning a new language

Benefits of learning a new language

Research shows that it's important to "exercise" your brain. Learning a language is one of the most effective ways to do this.
Benefits of speaking or learning a second language:

  • It improves overall cognitive abilities.
  • It decreases cognitive decline in older age. People learning a second language has lowered risks of Alzheimer's.
  • Multilingual people are skilful at switching between different systems of speech, writing, and structure, making them better multi-taskers.
  • Exercising your brain with learning a language improves your overall memory.
  • While learning a second language, you focus more on grammar, conjugations, and sentence structure, making you a more effective communicator.
  • Speaking another language means you have access to new words and cultures.
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Know your motivation

If you don’t have a good reason to learn a language, you are less likely to stay motivated over the long-run.

Once you’ve decided on a language, it’s crucial to commit.

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Why children find it easier to learn languages
  • Children are exposed to about 10,000 hours of language in their first four years. But children are seldom experts in a language by then, suggesting that they find it harder to learn a language.
  • Very young children can distinguish between about 800 sounds that make up all languages, but monolingual infants lose this ability in the first year of life as they become more specialised.
  • Children can learn more than one language at the same time if they have practice in both.
  • It is easier to learn to read and understand a new language than it is to speak it.
  • According to a recent study, the adult brain compartmentalizes speech in the left hemisphere, showing minimal plasticity.
  • As people become proficient in a language, their brains use both hemispheres to read and understand, but speech production remains cornered in the left hemisphere.

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