Being kind to our minds

Being kind to our minds

Our cognitive resources are one of the most valuable individual and collective assets we possess.

Cognitive kindness is extending a generosity of spirit toward others' minds and one's own mind. It starts from valuing our individual and collective cognitive abilities - to reason, to understand, to imagine, create, dream, enact.

Max Johnston (@maxjston) - Profile Photo

@maxjston

🌻

Self Improvement

MORE IDEAS FROM THE ARTICLE

Being kind to the mind depends on understanding how our minds work.

For example, studies show that people often overestimate how transparent they appear to others. In one study, participants induced to lie overestimated the extent to which others could tell they were lying.

  • Broadcast your intentions. Even if we think our intentions are apparent to others, they may not be.
  • Broadcast or even exaggerate your interest. If you are attending a presentation that you're very interested in, exaggerate your interest by leaning forward, nodding your head, and making eye contact.
  • Find other ways you can overcome the illusion of transparency with the goal of making another's thinking easier.

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

GET THE APP:

RELATED IDEAS

The best ideas come to those who wait

Many of us think that our creativity comes from our first ideas. We assume that finding creative solutions slow down over time.

This assumption is wrong, research suggests. The best ideas come to those who wait. Patience and perseverance will lead to more innovative solutions.

3

IDEAS

Cognitive distortions

When you think about your life, it is quite possible that you mind is playing tricks on you that can distort your view. 

Cognitive distortions—where your mind puts a ‘spin’ on the events you see and attaches a not-so-objective interpretation to what you experience—happen all the time.

We all have cognitive distortions, which are simply tendencies or patterns of thinking or believing, and they are especially common in people with depression and other mood disorders.

Narrative Habits

The way we talk to ourselves about the events in our lives is subject to the same laws of learning and habit formation that physical behaviors are.

That means we can learn to talk to ourselves in specific ways just like we can learn to tie our shoes or say please and thank you.

© Brainstash, Inc

AboutCuratorsJobsPress KitTopicsTerms of ServicePrivacy PolicySitemap