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How to Stop Procrastinating by Using the "2-Minute Rule"

Stop Procrastinating With the “2-Minute Rule”

The Rule states “When you start a new habit, it should take less than 2 minutes to do. So break down your habits into tasks that can be accomplished within 2 minutes.

The idea is to make your habits as easy as possible to start. Making a task from a habit short makes it feel less like a challenge and it works as a “gateway habit” that leads you down a more productive path.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

How to Stop Procrastinating by Using the "2-Minute Rule"

How to Stop Procrastinating by Using the "2-Minute Rule"

https://jamesclear.com/how-to-stop-procrastinating

jamesclear.com

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Key Ideas

If the 2-Minute Rule feels forced to you

... try this: do something you want to make into a habit for 2 minutes and then stop. And keep repeating.

This reinforces the identity you want to build and, eventually, you will feel like it’s a waste of time to do only the two minutes and will invest more time on.

Why The 2-Minute Rule Works

The point is not to do one thing, but to master the habit of showing up. A habit must be established before it can be improved. 

Mastering the art of showing up, the first 2 minutes become a ritual at the beginning of a larger routine. This is the ideal way to master a difficult skill. The more you ritualize the beginning of a process, the more likely it becomes that you can slip into the state of deep focus that is required to do great things. 

Stop Procrastinating With the “2-Minute Rule”

The Rule states “When you start a new habit, it should take less than 2 minutes to do. So break down your habits into tasks that can be accomplished within 2 minutes.

The idea is to make your habits as easy as possible to start. Making a task from a habit short makes it feel less like a challenge and it works as a “gateway habit” that leads you down a more productive path.

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The Reasoning Behind The 2–Minute Rule

The 2–Minute Rule overcomes procrastination by automating the decision-making process, making it so easy to start taking action that you can’t say no.

It consists of breaking down t...

The 2 Steps Of The 2-Minute Rule
  1. If it takes less than 2 minutes, then do it now.
  2. When you start a new habit, it should take less than two minutes to do.
Habits And The 2–Minute Rule

The 2–Minute Rule allows you to develop a process of consistently taking action, regardless of goal achievement. The focus is on taking action and letting things flow from there.

The 2–Minute Rule works for big and small goals because of the inertia of life. Once you start doing something, it’s easier to continue doing it. And beginning is the hardest part of a new habit — not just the first time, but each time.

Habit tracking

Is a simple and effective thing to do if you want to stick with a habit for good. No matter the format (calendar, journal, app), it provides immediate evidence whether you are making progress or...

The power of habit tracking:
  1. It creates a visual cue that can remind you to act.
  2. It is motivating to see the progress you are making. You don't want to break your streak.
  3. It feels satisfying to record your success in the moment.
To make habit tracking easier:
  1. Manual tracking should be limited to your most important habits
  2. Record each measurement immediately after the habit occurs

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The “one-minute rule”
The “one-minute rule”

With this rule, you do anything that presents itself, right away, as long as you can do it in a minute: Hang up your coat, read a letter and toss it, fill in a form, answer an email, note down a ci...

Productivity and priorities

One nice thing about the “one-minute rule” is that you don’t have to think about priorities, because you do anything that presents itself, right away.

And your productivity will shot up because you get so many little things got done quickly, so you'll have more time for the bigger tasks.

The 2-Minute Rule
  • If you can do it in less than two minutes, do it now (assuming you have no other, bigger priorities at the moment.)
  • When you start a new habit, make your goals into 2-minut...
The Benefits Of The 2-Minute Rule
  • If you're trying to build new habits and skills, making every step of the way an easily achievable 2-minute chunk, will make you more likely to do it over and over again.
  • The 2–Minute Rule works for big goals as well as small goals because of the inertia of life. Once you start doing something, it’s easier to continue doing it. It also teaches you to get to the point of getting things done.
The Danger Of The 2—Minute Rule

It’s easy to loose track of time after starting a 2-minute task. Although it’s a good thing that you can immerse yourself in a task that you had to use the 2-minute rule to begin with, losing track of time may leave you behind on everything else.

Pay attention to your schedule and prioritize properly.

Habit matching

When planning on building new habits, one easy way to integrate them into your everyday routine is by actually adding them to an already existing habit. 

Therefore, choose one habit y...

A step at a time

Once you have made up your mind about taking on a new habit, you might as well start getting used to it. Just remember that we have, as humans, the tendency to work better without pressure and when taking one step at a time. 

Therefore, start by creating small habits and get used to them and you will see how easy it is to build long-lasting routines that will make your life easier.

Practice makes perfect

When having taken the decision to introduce in your routine a new habit, it is very important to remember that practice makes perfect. Consequently, wait no more and start doing even if just a bit every day. You will eventually succeed in adding a new habit while feeling proud of yourself for being consistent.

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Default choices
Default choices

90% of your daily decisions happen automatically, many shaped by your environment. Thus, most decisions are a habit, not a deliberate choice.

To make smarter choices, design smarter...

Designing your life

Design your life like a choice architect:

  • Encourage smarter decisions you want to do by making them more accessible.
  • Add friction to habits you want to quit, making them less accessible, or remove the option to perform them completely.
Richard Thaler
Richard Thaler

“First, never underestimate the power of inertia. Second, that power can be harnessed.” 

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Habits and behavior change
Building habits to change behavior the right way can be a wonderful tool to improve your life. But false notions about what habits are and what they can do can ...
Habits are a type of learning

They generate an impulse to do a behavior with little or no conscious thought.

By forming a habit, the brain frees the mind to do other things without deliberation. So behaviors that require concentration, deliberation, or extended effort, are not habits.

What drives motivation

Motivation is not driven by pleasure and pain, but rather by the desire to escape discomfort.

Our brains get our bodies to do what they want through discomfort. And the same rule applies to psychological discomfort. 

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Benefits

It is never too late to start running. Many take up this sport in their 50s and beyond. To start, you only need a good pair of running shoes and a desire.

Running is a very effective...

Types of running
  • Road Running: running on paved roads, paths, and sidewalks.
  • Treadmill Running: easier than outdoor running and can be gentler on your joints.
  • Racing. Road races can vary from 5Ks to half or full marathons or even ultramarathons. 
  • Trail Running: it takes place on hiking trails, from deserts to mountains.
  • Track Running. Track events include shorter distance races from the 50-yard dash to 400-meter sprints. 
Getting Started
  • Invest in Shoes and Gear. Visit a specialty running store to get fitted for the best shoes for you and check out gear such as running shorts, tops, or tights made of wicking fibers.
  • Stay Safe. Do a warmup before you start, like a walk or an easy jog for 5 min.
  • Follow running safety advice, such as going against traffic when running on roads. Always carry some form of identification with you.
  • Use the Run/Walk Method. Start with running for one minute, then walk for one minute. Try to increase the running intervals over time.
  • Make It Manageable. Keep a conversational pace during each workout. If you can't speak in a full sentence, slow down. Breathe through your nose to get enough oxygen.

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Getting Things Done: the basics
  • Capture. Write down everything you need to do.
  • Clarify. Break down each task into an actionable next step. 
  • Organize. Move each of those actionable ta...
The 2-minute rule
If a task takes less than 2 minutes, then do it now.

If the effort to keep remembering a task is more than just getting it out of the way now, then do it.

Fixing small tasks
  • Fixing things is empowering. Our confidence increases or decreases based on our ability to make progress. 
  • Any progress builds momentum (and your mood): No matter how small the task is, crossing it off your to-do list gives you a boost of momentum and enhances your mood.
  • Small steps turn into habits: When a task is easy to do and quickly completed, it’s much easier to turn it into a habit.

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A positive frame of mind
It is a really good idea to force yourself into a positive frame of mind at least once per day. No matter what happens each day, when you sit down for dinner, think about the good in you...
The cumulative effect
The individual impact of any one piece of gratitude is small, but the cumulative effect is huge. The power of this habit comes from a multiplier effect that takes hold after practicing it for a month or two. You begin to realize that nearly every day is a good day (at least in a small way).
Gratitude is free
You start to realize how insignificant monetary things are for your day-to-day happiness. The majority of your grateful moments don’t cost a dime: time spent with friends and family, something nice someone said, a good workout that day. 

That’s not to say money is unimportant, but there is something comforting in realizing that the moments you’re actually grateful for each day are free.

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