The Reasoning Behind The 2–Minute Rule - Deepstash
The Reasoning Behind The 2–Minute Rule

The Reasoning Behind The 2–Minute Rule

The 2–Minute Rule overcomes procrastination by automating the decision-making process, making it so easy to start taking action that you can’t say no.

It consists of breaking down tasks into chunks that can be completed into 2 minutes and deciding to do immediately any tasks that fit into this timeframe. Obviously, many goals take more than 2 minutes, but following this rule allows you to kickstart a habit and slowly add on to it, making it less likely that you will give up.

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MORE IDEAS FROM THE ARTICLE

  1. If it takes less than 2 minutes, then do it now.
  2. When you start a new habit, it should take less than two minutes to do.

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The 2–Minute Rule allows you to develop a process of consistently taking action, regardless of goal achievement. The focus is on taking action and letting things flow from there.

The 2–Minute Rule works for big and small goals because of the inertia of life. Once you start doing something, it’s easier to continue doing it. And beginning is the hardest part of a new habit — not just the first time, but each time.

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RELATED IDEAS

If the 2-Minute Rule feels forced to you

... try this: do something you want to make into a habit for 2 minutes and then stop. And keep repeating.

This reinforces the identity you want to build and, eventually, you will feel like it’s a waste of time to do only the two minutes and will invest more time on.

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The Danger Of The 2—Minute Rule

It’s easy to loose track of time after starting a 2-minute task. Although it’s a good thing that you can immerse yourself in a task that you had to use the 2-minute rule to begin with, losing track of time may leave you behind on everything else.

Pay attention to your schedule and prioritize properly.

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The “one-minute rule”

With this rule, you do anything that presents itself, right away, as long as you can do it in a minute: Hang up your coat, read a letter and toss it, fill in a form, answer an email, note down a citation, put a dish in the dishwasher, etc. 

Because the tasks are so quick, it isn’t too hard to make yourself follow the rule, but it has big results. Keeping all those small, nagging tasks under control makes you more serene, less overwhelmed.

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