Impressionist Art: Initial Criticism - Deepstash
Impressionist Art: Initial Criticism

Impressionist Art: Initial Criticism

Impressionist art was looked at with disdain by art critics, as it was commonly accepted that any serious artist would minimize brush strokes and create a glossy, refined painting, not something with visible dots, blobs and smears.

During the first Impressionist art exhibition in 1874, the conservative painters and critics saw this kind of art as unfinished and unprofessional, turning the word ‘impressionist’ into a derogatory term.

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Paintings: Impressionist Style Of Art

First seen in the mid-19th century, impressionist art captured the immediate impression of scenery or moment, communicated by the artist using light, reflection and separated colours.

The capturing of light was done using short brushstrokes done quickly and freely, making the painting appear rough and messy to some.

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In 1874, the group of artists who drew in the rough and messy ‘impressionist’ style clubbed together in France and pooled their resources, promoting their art in their very own exhibition.

French critics, who were used to the official, acceptable exhibitions, were further perplexed at the audacity and how the limits of art were pushed beyond recognition.

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Impressionist art was a shift from mythology, historical events and other kinds of 'epic' paintings towards street life in Paris, contemporary life, rural leisure life, and other new places that were never explored by painters before.

The mixing of colours captured the shifting of light, with innovative use of saturation, mixing, and broken colours, giving a vivid intensity to the same.

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Most of the impressionist artists lived in Paris, France during the late 19th century and were friends, often meeting at Café Guerbois.

These groundbreaking artists like Claude Monet, Edgar Degas, Pierre-August Renoir, Camille Pissarro and many others, left an indelible mark on art.

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RELATED IDEA

Most important art movements
  • Medieval art
  • Renaissance 1300–1600
  • Baroque 1600–1730
  • Rococo 1720–1780
  • Neoclassicism 1750–1830
  • Romanticism 1780–1880
  • Impressionism 1860–1890
  • Post-impressionism 1886–1905
  • Expressionism 1905–1930
  • Cubism 1907–1914
  • Futurism 1910–1930
  • Art Deco 1909–1939
  • Abstract Expressionism 1940s
  • Contemporary art 1946 — present

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Abstract Art: Many Shades And Hues

Visually different from figurative art, abstract art came in the early 20th century and used colours, lines, forms and shapes to create unseen compositions, with little or faint relation with the outside world.

It expanded upon the artist’s freedom of expression, imagination, inner turmoil, spirituality and spontaneity.

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Paris: Home of the Enlightenment

The Enlightenment was a movement that promoted values of reason, evidence-based knowledge, free inquiry, individual liberty, humanism, limited government, and the separation of church and state.

18th century Paris served as a place for intellectual discourse where philosophes birthed the Age of Enlightenment. Paris earned the nickname "the City of Light."

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