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Three questions to ask yourself when you feel overwhelmed by career choices

"Do what you love”...

...  is career advice that’s easy to give, but  hard to follow, because we can’t always accurately predict what kind of job we’ll love until we’re actually doing it. Or maybe we love doing a lot of things.

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Three questions to ask yourself when you feel overwhelmed by career choices

Three questions to ask yourself when you feel overwhelmed by career choices

https://qz.com/work/1627676/a-columbia-professor-says-3-questions-can-help-you-choose-the-right-career/

qz.com

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Key Ideas

"Do what you love”...

...  is career advice that’s easy to give, but  hard to follow, because we can’t always accurately predict what kind of job we’ll love until we’re actually doing it. Or maybe we love doing a lot of things.

Questions to help you choose the right career

  • What can I do better than others? Think about what you're really good at, and how you could use the skills where you have an edge in order to get results.
  • What problems do I want to solve? This question is productive because it helps you identify your values and the issues you care about, without confining you to a narrow role.
  • How do I want to be known? What you do for a living often informs other people’s impressions of you—as well as your own self-image. For example, if you want people to think you’re a helpful, trustworthy, caring person, you might want to consider a job in a classic “helping” field, like being a kindergarten teacher.

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  • Present: Talk a little bit about what your current role is, the scope of it, and possibly a recent achievement.
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