Three questions to ask yourself when you feel overwhelmed by career choices - Deepstash

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Three questions to ask yourself when you feel overwhelmed by career choices

https://qz.com/work/1627676/a-columbia-professor-says-3-questions-can-help-you-choose-the-right-career/

qz.com

Three questions to ask yourself when you feel overwhelmed by career choices
"Do what you love" is career advice that's easy to give, but notoriously hard to follow. For one thing, we can't always accurately predict what kind of job we'll love until we're actually doing it. For another, we may love doing a lot of things: solving math problems, helping others, interior decorating, eating pie, playing with dogs.

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"Do what you love”...

"Do what you love”...

...  is career advice that’s easy to give, but  hard to follow, because we can’t always accurately predict what kind of job we’ll love until we’re actually doing it. Or maybe we love doing a lot of things.

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Questions to help you choose the right career

  • What can I do better than others? Think about what you're really good at, and how you could use the skills where you have an edge in order to get results.
  • What problems do I want to solve? This question is productive because it helps you identify your values and the issues you care about, without confining you to a narrow role.
  • How do I want to be known? What you do for a living often informs other people’s impressions of you—as well as your own self-image. For example, if you want people to think you’re a helpful, trustworthy, caring person, you might want to consider a job in a classic “helping” field, like being a kindergarten teacher.

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Workplace Anxiety

It happens when you feel restless and stuck, and you have a sense of vague fear which leads to unproductiveness. It is an existential feeling that is hard to articulate. A constant sens...

Anxiety Vs Negative Emotion

Negative emotions (lack of confidence, toxic energy, fear) can also cause anxiety. The difference between the two is the feeling of being unsafe that comes with anxiety.

When you are anxious, the ability to think clearly is lost, and so is the perspective. Breathing exercises and making space in your mind by slowing down is the first step towards remaining calm in this general state of anxiety.

Objectify The Problem

Start journaling, asking specific questions to bring the main issue in focus, to get organized and gain clarity. Ask yourself these four questions:

  1. What feels wrong?
  2. How can the problem be defined?
  3. What are the fears with regards to making changes?
  4. What actions can be taken that would improve the situation?

Why Interviewers Ask It

This introductory question serves as an icebreaker to lend an easy flow to the conversation. It helps the recruiter to get to know you in terms of hard and soft skills.

It’s a great op...

How to build your response

  • Present: Talk a little bit about what your current role is, the scope of it, and possibly a recent achievement.
  • Past: Tell the interviewer how you got there and/or mention a past experience that’s relevant to the job and company you’re applying for.
  • Future: Continue with what you’re looking to do next and why you’re interested in this job.
You do not have to respond in this order. Tweak it to suit you. Make sure to tie it to the job and company.

Tailor Your Answer

Interviewers want to know how your answer about yourself is relevant to the position and company you’re applying for.

This is an opportunity to articulate why you’re interested and how your objective fulfills their goals. In order to do that, spend some time researching the company. If your answers resonate with them, it shows that you really understand the role.