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The 5 Rules Followed By Accountable Leaders

Accountability

It means responsible behavior, and requires a personal understanding of our own role and responsibilities, our individual performance goals, including standards to measure success, our major obstacles to fulfilling responsibilities and the needs and means we required to successfully perform.

Effective leaders at all levels understand the importance of two-way accountability and act accordingly.

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The 5 Rules Followed By Accountable Leaders

The 5 Rules Followed By Accountable Leaders

https://www.forbes.com/sites/palomacanterogomez/2019/06/07/the-5-rules-followed-by-accountable-leaders/

forbes.com

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Key Ideas

Accountability

It means responsible behavior, and requires a personal understanding of our own role and responsibilities, our individual performance goals, including standards to measure success, our major obstacles to fulfilling responsibilities and the needs and means we required to successfully perform.

Effective leaders at all levels understand the importance of two-way accountability and act accordingly.

Rules Followed By Accountable Leaders

  1. They take full responsibility for decisions.
  2. They take responsibility for communication and make sure their decisions and actions plans are clearly understood.
  3. They always think and say, “We” instead of “I.”
  4. They run effective meetings. 
  5. They transform problems into constructive feedback.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The ABCDs of categorizing decisions
The ABCDs of categorizing decisions
  • Big-bet decisions: infrequent and high-risk - from major acquisitions to game-changing capital investments;
  • Cross-cutting decisions: frequent and high-risk - think pricin...
Approaching big bet decisions
  • Appoint an executive sponsor to work with a project lead to frame important decisions for senior leaders to weigh in on;
  • Break things down (with decision meetings at each stage), and connect them up.
  • Focuses on debating the solution (instead of endlessly elaborating the problem) and gather the right people.
  • Move faster without losing commitment: get comfortable living with imperfect data and being clear about what “good enough” looks like.
Approaching cross-cutting decisions
  • Identify decisions that involve a cross-cutting group of leaders, and work with the stakeholders of each to agree on what the main steps in the process entail.
  • Work through a set of real-life scenarios to pressure-test the system in collaboration with the people who will be running the process.
  • Limit the number of decision-making bodies, and clarify for each its mandate, standing membership, roles etc.
  • Create shared objectives, metrics, and collaboration targets.

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Be humble, not charismatic

Charisma is useful for engaging and inspiring others.
However, unchecked charisma can lead to a reputation of self-absorption and self-promotion

The team may become co...

Be steady and dependable

As a leader, being reliable and responsible is important for your team. You stand a good chance in gaining the trust of your team if you show that you exercise caution, take calculated risks, and will hold to the organizational principles.

Modesty is the best policy

There is a degree of responsibility (and professionalism) that is expected from those in charge.
Trying to be the fun boss will harm your reputation eventually. It is good to keep some space between you and your team.

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The Pressure Of Time

Most leaders have familiar approaches to managing time: setting goals, planning, delegating, tracking commitments, and creating to-do lists. While these approaches do help in self-organization, the...

Sustainable Productivity

Instead of increasing the number of productive hours, we can focus on getting the right things done in a timely way. We also need to restore and balance ourselves, our colleagues, family and environment, instead of a neurotic or pathological focus on deadlines.

Find out what's truly important to us and use the finite resource of time wisely.

Phantom Workload

Phantom workload looks like real work but results in massive unproductivity and even conflict in an organization. The pressure to meet unrealistic expectations causes a vicious cycle of further workload.

Leaders need to take a hard look at what is being avoided or not addressed. Facing difficult tasks that were 'swept under the carpet' earlier strengthens them further to make hard decisions and face difficult people and situations.

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