Why did 17th-century plague doctors wear peculiar beaked masks? - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

Why did 17th-century plague doctors wear peculiar beaked masks?

https://www.historyextra.com/period/stuart/why-what-bubonic-plague-doctor-wear-beak-beaked-mask-bubonic-black-death-facts-history-strange-outfit-clothing-cloak/

historyextra.com

Why did 17th-century plague doctors wear peculiar beaked masks?
What were plague doctors and why did some of them wear beaked masks? With their long cloaks and grotesque bird-like masks, these medical professionals made for a disconcerting sight in 17th-century Europe. Here's a quick guide to their strange protective clothing...

2

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

The beaked masks from the 17th century

The beaked masks from the 17th century

During the 17th century plague, doctors were said to have worn long cloak, grotesque bird-like mask, a wide-brimmed hat, and wooden cane, serving as protection against the odors coming from the plague. It was a particular sight for sure.

25 SAVES

55 READS


VIEW

The doubtful existence of the beaked mask 

The doubtful existence of the beaked mask 

While today one can still find a lot of images on the way doctors were dressed during the 17th-century plague in Italy, the same cannot be said about England. Here there is no evidence about such a costume to have ever been worn.

32 SAVES

55 READS


SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Making Things Happen

A leader's vision may or may not be that different from the next person's; what can set them apart is the vigour with which they pursue that st...

Boldness Of Vision

Leaders need to have a relatable and understandable long-term view of where an organization is headed.

When faced with the issue of slavery before the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln’s vision was that the United States should be “a nation conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. "

Changing The Mood

Changing the mood of an organization can be enough to stave off collapse and foster progress.
Nelson Mandela changed the mood of a divided South Africa coming out of the brink of civil war and facing a future with a high likelihood of inter-racial conflict. Once elected, he ran the new multiracial government with a light but decisive touch and set the tone – relaxed, inclusive, cheerful – that would create a new mood in the country.

2 more ideas

The Common Cold

With over 200 different kinds of viruses that make up the common cold, Science is struggling to find a cure.

Adults suffer this elusive, widespread, and infectious disease 2 to 4 times...

The 7 Identified Virus Families

Scientists to date have identified seven virus families that cause the majority of colds:

  • rhinovirus
  • the new 2019
  • influenza
  • parainfluenza
  • adenovirus
  • respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)
  • metapneumovirus.

Vaccines vs Drugs

For Doctors, vaccines are preferable to drugs as they protect the host even before any infection.

For Pharmaceutical companies (Big Pharma), vaccines don't spell money, as much as over-the-counter drugs and treatment do.

Mindful Communication

Bringing awareness, or mindfulness, to the way we communicate with others has both practical and profound applications.

We can train ourselves to:

  • recognize when the channel...

Label How You Feel

Each of us already has this natural communication system that feeds us information all the time. So when we close down and become defensive—for a few minutes, a few days, months or even a lifetime—we’re cutting ourselves off not only from others, but also from our natural ability to communicate. 

Mindful communication trains us to become aware of when we’ve stopped using our innate communication wisdom.

Defensive Reactions Zone

When we react to fear by shutting down the channel of communication, we’ve put up a defensive barrier that divides us from the world.

Signs you’re in the red light zone:

  • Our values shift to me-first.  We tell ourselves that relationships are not that important. 
  • Closed communication patterns are controlling and mistrustful. We see others as frozen objects that have importance only if they meet our needs.
  • We feel alone and emotionally hungry. Then we look to other people to rescue us from our aloneness. 
  • The sense of isolation that our defensive barrier triggers is subconsciously terrifying. If we are indeed isolated individuals, how do we get our supplies? How do we ward off enemies?
  • Suppressing these inner fears makes us even more rigid and out of touch. We tighten our muscles and thoughts; we harden our hearts.