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The subtle reasons why leaders ignore their own advice

https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article/20200420-the-subtle-reasons-why-leaders-ignore-their-own-advice

bbc.com

The subtle reasons why leaders ignore their own advice
In order to minimise the suffering caused by Covid-19, global leaders are asking everyone to make sacrifices. People around the world are giving up, for a period, many of the things they love doing: visiting friends and family, travelling, shopping, congregating with others.

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Following the rules

Following the rules

If there is one group of people you expect to set an example and follow the rules, it would be the people issuing them. In New Zealand, the health minister Dr. David Clark was demoted after he ...

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Pleasing different stakeholders

The simplest reason leaders are inconsistent is that they think they can get away with it. Although that may be true in some cases, most people like to see themselves as virtuous.

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Different cultural views

In countries that emphasize the needs of the group over the individual, like Asian and Latin American countries, inconsistent behavior is not immediately associated with hypocrisy.

In colle...

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Stockpiling virtue

A reason leaders behave inconsistently is a phenomenon called 'moral licensing.' When people do or say something virtuous, they seem to feel licensed to act in ways that might otherwise...

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Sometimes, being pragmatic necessitates doing seemingly bad things to achieve good results. This means that leaders may have to act in strategic misrepresentation, contrary to their own feelings.

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