Should You Specialize or Be a Generalist? | Tim Ferriss - Deepstash

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Should You Specialize or Be a Generalist? | Tim Ferriss

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wCPbPMRNnvk

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Should You Specialize or Be a Generalist? | Tim Ferriss
Should you specialize or be a generalist? | Sign up for Tim's free "5-Bullet Friday" newsletter: https://go.tim.blog/5-bullet-friday-yt/ SUBSCRIBE: http://bi...

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Being a specialized generalist

Being a specialized generalist

It means aiming to combine a few skills that are not usually combined.

If you associate two valuable skills that are even more valuable together (for example, computer science and a law degree, or math and public speaking), you will have a competitive advantage that allows you to reach the top of the earning power.

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When specialization makes sense

Specialization makes sense when you know you can reach the top of the domain you are trying to excel in.

If you want to specialize and become a basketball player, for example, you have to reach the top 0,001% to have phenomenal financial gains.

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Warren Buffett's best investment

Warren Buffett's best investment
Warren Buffett, the famous investor, stated that his most important investment was in Dale Carnegie's speaking course because being a good communicator (both in speech and in writing) highlights, even more, the other skills you happen to have.

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Winning even if you fail

This means to take the time and consider the projects you choose to pursue based on the skills and the relationships you will be able to develop that have the potential to last even after those projects will finish.

Skills to consider: public speaking, writing, and negotiation. These are examples of marketable skills that can be transferred to other areas outside those particular projects.

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