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Skill Stacking: A Practical Strategy To Achieve Career Success

https://dariusforoux.com/skill-stacking/

dariusforoux.com

Skill Stacking: A Practical Strategy To Achieve Career Success
One of the most popular ideas in personal development is that all successful people have achieved mastery. Many of us believe in this false notion that you have to master a skill to achieve career success. That's because we, as a society, admire and glorify winners.

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Mastery doesn't equal success

Mastery doesn't equal success

"Success wise, you’re better off being good at two complementary skills than being excellent at one." - Scott Adams

Every skill you acquire doubles your odds of success. You don’t need to become the best in the world to be successful. All you need is a valuable skillset to achieve that level of career success.

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Useful skills for your Skill Stack

Useful skills for your Skill Stack
  1. Productivity: The mother of all skills. With solid productivity skills, you can learn anything.
  2. Writing: The ability to translate your thoughts into words makes it easier to do your job.
  3. Psychology: Knowing the basics of psychology helps in dealing with other people, and yourself.
  4. Persuasion:  The art and science of communicating in a way that resonates with people.
  5. Personal Finance.

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The career pitfall

Careers used to be kind of like a 40-year tunnel. You picked your tunnel, and once you were in, that was that. You worked in that profession for 40 years or so before the tunnel spit you out on the other side into your retirement.

Today’s career landscape isn’t a lineup of tunnels, it’s a massive, impossibly complex, rapidly changing science laboratory. 

Why Career-path-carving is important.

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Identity. We tell people about our careers by telling them what we are.

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The modern polymath

... is someone who becomes competent in at least 3 diverse domains and integrates them into a top 1-percent skill set.

In another words, they bring the best of what humanity has discov...

Creating an atypical combination of 2+ skills

Even if you're merely competent in these skills, combining them can lead to a world-class skill set.

Example: Scott Adams, the creator of Dilbert, one of the most popular comic strips of all time, was not the funniest person,  not the best cartoonist, and not the most experienced employee. But by combining his humor and illustration skills while focusing on business culture, he became the best in the world in his niche.

Creative breakthroughs

Most creative breakthroughs come via making atypical combinations of skills.

Researcher Brian Uzzi, a professor at the Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management, analyzed more than 26 million scientific papers going back hundreds of years and found that the most impactful papers often have teams with atypical combinations of backgrounds.