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How your age affects your appetite

https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20180629-the-seven-stages-of-life-that-affect-how-we-eat

bbc.com

How your age affects your appetite
We all need food every day, but our changing relationship with it through the years can have a big impact on our health.

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Our Relationship With Food Through The Ages

Our Relationship With Food Through The Ages

While everyone eats every day, hungry or not, our relationship with food changes, based on our age.

Apart from hunger, our mind and body get the ‘cue’ to eat using advertising, smells, sounds and certain visuals, leading to recreational consumption.

There are seven stages of appetite that influence our eating habits.

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The Stages Of Appetite

  • Age 0-10: Rapid growth and heavy dietary requirements mark this time, and one has to watch out for junk food eating habits along with certain controlled eating formations in kids.
  • Age 10-20: The hormonal changes in this age along with the teen lifestyle trigger unhealthy food choices in this critical age.
  • Age 20-30: College, marriage, live-in or parenthood often leads to weight gain, as the body tends to send strong signals to eat, but not for overeating.
  • Age 30-40: Lack of a work-life balance and certain food addictions affect one’s health during mid-life. The working population often sacrifice their hunger pangs by unhealthy snacking (like coffee and doughnuts), as the focus is on productivity, not health.
  • Age 40-50: Lifestyle problems start to come in the picture in this age due to the kind of diet consumed in the earlier stages, though some symptoms are silent, like high blood pressure or cholesterol.
  • Age 50-60: The body starts to decline, with a gradual loss of muscle mass (called sarcopenia) which is due to less physical activity and consuming less protein.

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Food In the Old Age

Age 60-70: Good nutrition along with a functioning body is crucial at an old age, due to lack of hunger which leads to a loss of weight and illnesses of the mind and body.

Food is crucial in all ages but is especially important (along with physical activity) in old age even though many complications arise like dental problems, swallowing issues and reduced taste and smell.

One should savour and relish the food we eat and follow the basic guidelines of exercise and nutrition.

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