Halloween: costumes, history, myths, and more - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

Halloween: costumes, history, myths, and more

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/news/2018/10/101029-halloween-costumes-ideas-history-science-nation/

nationalgeographic.com

Halloween: costumes, history, myths, and more
Get the facts on Halloween's history and why we love it so much today.

4

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

The origins of Halloween

The origins of Halloween

Halloween originated more than 2,000 years ago. Europe's Celtic people celebrated their New Year's Day on November 1.

On the eve - what we know as Halloween - spirits were believed to walk the Earth as they traveled to the afterlife.

62 SAVES


VIEW

Halloween costumes

According to the American Folklife Center, Celts often wore costumes to confuse spirits. Celts also wore masks or blackened their faces to impersonate dead ancestors.

An early form of trick-or-treating involved Celts, costumed as spirits, to have moved from house to house, exchanging food and drink for silly acts.

48 SAVES


All Saint's Day

Samhain, the Celtic peoples New Year's Day, was changed by the seventh century Pope Boniface IV to All Saint's Day, or All Hallows' Day. Later it was name Halloween.

European immigrants brought Halloween to the United States, but it only became more known in the 1800s, when Irish-American immigration increased.

46 SAVES


Halloween Urban Legends

Some Halloween spook stories continue to surface, although there is little substance behind it.

Examples include satanic cults that sacrifice black cats on Halloween. Another is candy tainted by poisons, needles, or razor blades. There are no substantiated reports of a child being killed or seriously injured by a contaminated treat picked up while out trick-or-treating.

44 SAVES


SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Ancient Origins of Halloween

Halloween’s origins date back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain, in the area that is now Ireland.  On the night of October 31 they celebrated Samhain, when it was believed that the gho...

All Saints' Day

  • On May 13, 609 A.D., Pope Boniface IV dedicated the Pantheon in Rome in honor of all Christian martyrs and the Catholic feast of All Martyrs Day was established. Pope Gregory III later expanded the festival and moved the observance from May 13 to November 1.
  • The influence of Christianity spread into Celtic lands, where it gradually blended with and supplanted older Celtic rites. In 1000 A.D., the church made November 2 All Souls’ Day, a day to honor the dead. It was probably done to replace the Celtic festival.
  • All Souls’ Day was celebrated similarly to Samhain, with big bonfires, parades and dressing up in costumes as saints, angels and devils. The All Saints’ Day celebration was also called All-hallows or All-hallowmas, and eventually, Halloween.

Halloween Comes to America

The celebration of Halloween was limited in colonial New England, but as the beliefs and customs of different European ethnic groups and the American Indians meshed, a distinctly American version of Halloween began to emerge.

In the second half of the nineteenth century, America was flooded with Irish immigrants, fleeing the Irish Potato Famine. This helped to popularize the celebration of Halloween nationally.

3 more ideas

Face and Embrace Your Impermanence

Make room in this season to turn inward and become still.

Are you overcoming your fears and go after your dreams? When we can acknowledge your impermanence without letting feelings tak...

Face and Embrace Your Inner Demons

Try to identify areas in your life that make you feel all rigid inside, ashamed, judgmental or angry. Under rigidities is where your inner demons hide and when you look them straight in the eye, they tend to disappear.

The 'dark factor'

A love of horror movies is associated with an underlying dimension of entertainment preferences, dubbed "the dark factor".

Those with dark tastes value intensity, edginess and rebellion. Thei...

The pleasure paradox

Some derive enjoyment from negative emotional states, as when enjoying a "good cry", for instance.

A study found that people who liked sad films enjoyed a scene relative to how much sadness it elicited. The stronger the sadness, the higher the enjoyment.

Trick or treat

Halloween seems to bring out excesses in costumed children and adults.

Several studies revealed that costumed children who were anonymous — by wearing masks for instance — were more likely to take extra candies. In adults, costumed Halloween celebrators tend to have higher blood alcohol readings than people in plain clothes.