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How parent involvement enhances classroom community | The JotForm Blog

https://www.jotform.com/blog/parent-teacher-communication/

jotform.com

How parent involvement enhances classroom community | The JotForm Blog
Parents have strong opinions about the education of their children, so teachers are first in line for their feedback. The perspectives of parents, however, have an important role to play in helping all students succeed. Here's how teachers can improve communication with parents by incorporating feedback into field trips, community events, and peer mentorships.

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Parent-teacher groups

Creating parent-teacher groups enables parents to share their opinion in regards to topics that concern directly their children, such as classroom activities, field trips, or homework. 

This can prove extremely efficient, as parents are the ones who know the best their kids and can, therefore, make great decisions when it comes to them.

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Parents and field trips

Allowing parents to participate in their children's field trips can prove an inspired idea, as they often have great suggestions. 

Moreover, getting their feedback both before and after the trip might lead to the improvement of such activities.

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Parent mentor programs

This kind of program often results in successful cooperation between parents and teachers, therefore ensuring that no feedback is lost. 

Parent volunteers get in contact with other parents for topics related to their children and forward their opinions to teachers, enabling an efficient communication of everybody's thoughts and suggestions.

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Encourage personal connections

The cooperation between teachers and parents can lead to a relationship based on mutual respect and exchange of opinions and experiences, which can only have good effects regarding a child's development.

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