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Today's Biggest Threat: The Polarized Mind

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/todays-biggest-threat-the-polarized-mind/

blogs.scientificamerican.com

Today's Biggest Threat: The Polarized Mind
As the bitter strife between left and right, citizen and noncitizen, white and non-white attest, the greatest threat to humanity today goes beyond political and religious divides, economics, and psychiatric diagnoses. It goes beyond cultural conflicts and even the degradation of the environment-and yet it includes all of these.

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The danger of the polarized mind

The danger of the polarized mind

The so-called 'polarized mind' is defined as a fixation on a single point of view while excluding all contrary opinions. 

This fixation will often result in mindlessness, which makes individuals feel satisfied with their own beliefs, without feeling the need to search for more information.

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Factors leading to a polarized mind

Fear and anxiety are two main factors that can lead to having a polarized mind. This is to say, whenever people feel extreme fear, they tend to be defensive towards others. 

Moreover, this kind of behavior can be recognized in extremists who, as a result of their own trauma, end up wanting the total control.

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Polarization today

Nowadays, polarization has enabled the revival of authoritarianism, a real threat to our society. 

In front of such danger, the dialogue between people sharing contrary points of view can prove extremely useful, as it allows individuals to become more open-minded and, therefore, to find solutions in order to fight the danger of the polarized mind.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Constructive engagement

Constructive engagement

Constructive engagement involves cultivating goodwill between the parties involved.

Fishbowl discussions

This exercise involves members of one party sitting in a circle with the other group sitting around them. The outside group listens quietly while the inside group answers a set of questions.

After each side answered and listened, the moderator brings them together for conversations about what everyone learned. Data suggests that despite strong views, participants change their attitude toward one another for the better.

Disagreement

We regularly find ourselves engaging with people whose core beliefs and values differ from our own. We might want to convince them to adopt our point of view, but this can lead to unproductive conflict.

However, people who disagree passionately can be easily trained to have productive interactions.

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The Music Of Bach

The Music Of Bach

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) was called the immortal God of Harmony by none other than Beethoven himself. The composer’s music inspires a feeling of love, reverence and even s...

Johann Sebastian Bach: Early Life

  • Born in 1685 in Germany, Bach was in a dynasty of musicians, though his mother and father died before he turned ten.
  • Even as an orphan, he got into what he loved, starting with organ music as a court musician, composing for church services.
  • This added a flavour of the devotion and love in his music at an early age. He started compiling instrumental music in Cöthen, moving away from his earlier style and using a more diverse range of instruments.

Johann Sebastian Bach: The Finest Years

  • Bach’s shifting to a cosmopolitan city in Germany resulted in a sort of serendipity that helped him compose his finest music like Magnificat, and about 200 cantata.
  • He composed gems like Christmas Oratorio and two great gospel compositions for Good Friday: St John and St Matthew.
  • Bach left incomplete a final collection called The Art of Fugue when he died in 1750.

Joker’s commentary on society

Joker’s commentary on society

Joker is a psychological movie, showing the dangers of group action and the power of group narratives.

It is a very interesting commentary on society as it mirrors the phenomenon of dei...

A dangerous movie

Many reviewers see the Joker as a dangerous film because it might inspire incels to identify with the character as a hero and copy him.

The real evil to be feared is a broken, frustrated society that is willing to participate in almost purposeless acts of violence, then put deeper meaning into it, and ultimately use it as a springboard for mass violence and brutality.

Society and Mass Violence

Gotham City in Joker is a fundamentally broken city.

  • Arthur Fleck (the Joker) is failed by every level of society.
  • However, every class in Joker wants to shift the blame.
  • When Arthur commits murder, society turns this purposeless act of violence into an act of social rebellion.
  • Despite knowing nothing about the reason for the murder, Gotham's people imbue it with shared meaning, forcing this event into their narrative, and held Joker as a hero.
  • When Arthur commits another purposeless murder, it sparks riots.
  • The real villain of the movie is the broader society that latches onto actions and imbues them with nonexistent meaning to justify their own crimes.