Breadcrumbed At Work

Breadcrumbing is a corporate practice in which the employee is provided the bare minimum or less than optimal information, feedback, rewards by the manager, keeping it a one-way communication.

The employee feels dejected, unvalued and confused. He has to work harder due to the opacity and limited set of information. He is kept in the dark as crucial information is not shared with him easily. There is no encouragement or listening to new ideas.

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Career

  • The employee cannot invest in a career if there is no visible sign of a career in the first place. The employee feels disposable and undervalued in the organization, with the manager ghosting him at times.
  • Important information is thrust upon the employee, rather than taking his opinion first.
  • There is no interest of the employer in employee development or empowerment.

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The Unattractive Option
  • The Unattractive Third Option (The Decoy) has no real value in itself and is just placed to sway the decision maker towards the higher-priced option.
  • The Decoy's only purpose is to make the expensive option appear like a bargain.
  • This has also been widely used in subscription options of magazines and in the high-end diamond market.

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IDEAS

In the new economy, knowledge workers have to manage themselves and have autonomy. They are no longer cogs in a wheel, but nodes in a neural network and their individual productivity is now more important than ever.

Importance Of Happiness At Work

Happy employees are compulsory for a growing business.

A study on organizational success revealed that employees who feel happy in the workplace are 65% more energetic than employees who don’t. They are two times more productive and are more likely to sustain their jobs over a long period of time.

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