How to Become a Plant Person When You're Super Busy and Kinda Lazy - Deepstash
How to Become a Plant Person When You're Super Busy and Kinda Lazy

How to Become a Plant Person When You're Super Busy and Kinda Lazy

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How to Become a Plant Person When You're Super Busy and Kinda Lazy

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Why we should keep some plants in our homes

Plants are pretty. They are affordable and can enhance a space and encourage cleaner air, often resulting in a better mood and more focused concentration.

But for the super busy, somewhat lazy, and possibly intimated person, they can be hard to keep alive. Knowing what the plants need can help us do better.

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Determine how much time, space and effort you can reasonably give to a new plant.

Then pay attention to your home's access to sunlight at different times of the day. When is it the brightest? What direction is the window facing? Is there a direct view to the sky? Even if you're sandwiched between two high-rises, certain plants thrive in low light situations.

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  • Heart leaf philodendron is very versatile with lighting conditions. It's pretty easy to tell if they need water, and they grow very fast.
  • Peperomias are non-toxic to pets and children.
  • Pothos, snake plants, and ZZ plants thrive in low light conditions.
  • Other easy plants are succulents, cacti, jade, ivy, and umbrella plants.

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  • Fiddle-leaf figs are high maintenance. These plants need good light.
  • Ferns can also be tricky. If you forget to water them, they'll crisp up quickly. If they do, water them, and cut away the dead fronds. In a couple of weeks, you'll see new growth.

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  • If you move often, it can be stressful on plants. But if you try to give them a very similar environment, they'll do fine.
  • Many houseplants are toxic to animals, so knowing which ones are safe is important.
  • If you jet off regularly, more drought-tolerant plants such as ponytail palm, spider plants, or succulents are the way to go.

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  • Overwatering plants can kill it as the stagnant water sitting on the plant causes root rot. But even then, you can save it. If you can see any green bits, you can cut those and try rooting them again.
  • If you've underwatered your plants, resume watering and give them a few weeks to revive.

Don't be afraid to experiment with plants. Some trial and error will make it possible to grow some plants.

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