How to Instill a Coaching Culture - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

How to Instill a Coaching Culture

https://www.ccl.org/blog/instill-coaching-culture/

ccl.org

How to Instill a Coaching Culture
Take a moment and ask yourself these 2 questions: Do you believe you have more potential than your current performance level? And if yes, what's the cost of opportunity of not using that potential more often?

2

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

Coaching culture benefits

It creates a climate where people learn how to:

  • Give and receive feedback.
  • Support and stretch someone’s thinking.
  • Challenge people’s performance plateau.
  • Engage in development conversations that are short in length but strong in impact.

20 SAVES


VIEW

Instilling a Coaching Culture

Instilling a Coaching Culture
  1. Make the case for coaching by allowing key influencers to experience its power: don't asset its value, demonstrate it.
  2. Integrate coaching as a core element of your talent and leadership development strategy.
  3. Equip HR professionals with coaching skills.

14 SAVES


SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Continuous improvement

Continuous improvement

Is an ongoing effort to improve all elements of an organization - processes, tools, products, services, etc. 

It rests on the belief that a steady stream of improvements, diligent...

3 Practices for Continuous improvement

  • Performance transparency: it starts with making goals public and cascading those goals  in a way that is tailored to individuals at all levels of the organization.
  • Knowledge sharing: critical to scaling best practices across (and up and down) organizations.
  • Employee involvement: frontline employees are closest to the work and typically have the richest insights on how their work can be done better. Capturing their perspectives is critical.

Remote-first Mindset

Accept that you have to put in place remote work systems, even if more than half of your employees ultimately revert to office-based work.

  • If done right, a remote-first infrastructu...

Build a socially-connected culture

Intentionally design for the same interactions that would otherwise happen if people were in the office.

  • Culture is what naturally happens when a group of people gets together for any period.
  • A great culture happens with intentional design and influence. It's the reason you should make your company's mission, vision, values, operating principles, standards, and agreements visible. 
  • Culture is experienced through emotions, including how your employees feel about the company, you, other leaders, and peers. That feeling is developed through human interaction at the water cooler, kitchen, or hallway conversations.

Your leadership presence

Your people need to feel your presence as a leader as they will have fewer opportunities to see you face to face when they work remotely.

  • Regularly show up in a variety of forms that can include weekly video meetings, periodic company-wide emails, or presence in public channels.
  • Err on the side of more communication rather than less.

12 more ideas

Leadership Development

Leadership development is viewed as a current and future priority. Despite efforts to produce and nurture new leaders, only 7 percent of senior managers think that their companies develop global le...

Overlooking context

Many training initiatives assume that the same group of skills or leadership styles are suitable without considering the strategy or organizational culture of a company.

An excellent leader in one situation does not necessarily perform well in another. Focusing on context means equipping leaders with two or three competencies that will make a distinction to performance, rather than a list of leadership standards that is of no specific benefit.

Separate reflection from real work

Companies face a challenge when it comes to planning the program's curriculum.  Adults typically retain only 10 percent of what they hear in classroom lectures, but nearly two-thirds when they learn by doing. 

The answer seems straightforward: tie leadership development to real on-the-job projects. While it is not easy to create opportunities that simultaneously address high-priority needs, companies should strive to make every major business project a leadership-development opportunity as well.