Creating a fictional universe and storyline - Deepstash

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20 Storytelling Lessons We Can Learn from Marvel

Creating a fictional universe and storyline

Creating a fictional universe and storyline
  • Learn everything you can about the period/culture you’re trying to portray.
  • Create a believable universe, not a pretty backdrop.
  • Invent creative solutions to your hero’s problems.
  • Give overdone tropes an exciting twist to keep viewers guessing until the end.
  • Avoid info-dumping by maintaining a thread of suspense until the last possible moment.
  • Leave certain elements open to interpretation.

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