How to Manage Stress at Work - Deepstash

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Stress Management: The Ultimate Guide

How to Manage Stress at Work

  • Take a deep breath. Slow, deep breaths activate your parasympathetic nervous system, which calms you down.
  • Don’t dwell on scary thoughts without any productive decisions.
  • Give yourself a break. Accept your negative emotions.
  • Exercise. Research suggests many of the benefits of exercise come in the first 20 minutes.

  • Reach out. In-person interactions cause your body to produce a bunch of hormones that counteract the “flight or flight” response.

  • Maintain a balanced lifestyle. 

  • Meditate.

  • Take notes of what tends to stress you out 

    so you can better control your reaction.
  • Set the right expectations. Treat stress like an inevitable part of your life. You’re not trying to erase stress, you’re simply trying to cope with it.

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Stress Management: The Ultimate Guide

Stress Management: The Ultimate Guide

https://blog.hubspot.com/sales/stress-management

blog.hubspot.com

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Key Ideas

Signs of Stress

  • Headaches
  • Chest pain
  • Fatigue
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Chest pains
  • Stomach ache
  • Hair loss
  • Eyelid twitching
  • Acne
  • Back pain
  • Rashes
  • Frequent colds and/or infections
  • High blood pressure

These are mostly short-term symptoms, but beware, sustained stress can change your biological systems and result in stroke, heart disease, and diabetes.

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Worry is the cognitive part of anxiety, with it's repetitive and obsessive thought patterns in our mind. Worry is sometimes essential for us to solve problems or take action, provided we are not st...

Stress

Stress is a biological response(or a reaction) to external changes and forces beyond one's resources. Signs of stress include a rapid heart rate, shallow breath, and an adrenaline rush.


Acute stress or temporary stress is normal and even beneficial. Chronic stress is linked to health concerns like heart disease and a weakened immune system.


Ways to Handle Stress:

  • Exercise daily.
  • Focus your energy on what you can control.
  • Know that your stress response is unique to you.
Anxiety

Anxiety is the culmination of worry and stress. It is a state of body and mind which is stressed and worried for no apparent reason, like a response to a false alarm.

An anxiety disorder is an acute form of anxiety and a serious medical condition.


How to Handle Anxiety:

  • Curb your sugar, alcohol and caffeine consumption.
  • Calm yourself by deep breathing and refocusing on your body parts.
  • Distract yourself by listening to music or a little exercise.
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    • The neural circuits in our emotional brain - the limbic system and subconscious memory systems - control our emotional responses in daily life.
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    • The brain activates the strongest circuit, which controls our responses.
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    • One technique is to complain briefly. It activates the reactive wire that has encoded an incorrect response.
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