How to Change Job Fields - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

Want to Change Careers? Here's Your Guide to Getting Started

How to Change Job Fields

How to Change Job Fields
  • Decide What Field you want to work in.
  • Learn what additional training you will need to transition.

  • Consider shadowing someone at the job for a day or two.

  • Consider how the pay and time commitment for the new position will affect your lifestyle?

  • Work on Training while continuing in your current position.

  • Create a New Resume for the new career field.

  • Use your contacts and other resources to Find a New Job.

  • Make sure you Switch Your Benefits.

  • Do not burn any bridges when you leave your job.

46 SAVES


EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Your Future Career Remuneration

Look at the bottom end of the average salaries of the career you are interested in and ask yourself whether you'd be able to survive on that if you got one of those jobs.

Similarly, lo...

Brush Up Your Skills
  • Research What's In Demand. Your first stop should be the boards and company websites that post the jobs you're interested in.
  • Beef Up Your Resume. Don't neglect the experience you already bring to the table. Soft skills you may have learned (management skills, organizational skills, etc) may be a huge benefit, so don't write them off completely. 
  • Go Back to School to pick up those new languages, skills, and techniques required to be competitive in your chosen field. 
  • Build Your Network. Get acquainted not just with the people you want to emulate, but other people who are doing what you do now.
Get Some Experience
  • Use Your Skills for Personal or Pet Projects.
  • Intern or Volunteer.
  • Freelance or Start a Side Gig.

“The biggest risk is not taking any risk. In a world that is changing really quickly, the only strategy that is gu..."

Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Facebook
Skills Needed In Digital Leaders
  • Work together, complement each other, and function as a team.
  • Able to operate on and enable environments that are more dynamic, team-centric, and connected.
  • Lead and build teams and partner with the broader ecosystems, keep people connected and engaged, and drive a culture of innovation, learning, and continuous improvement.
  • Lead a workforce that includes contractors, the contingent workforce, and crowd talent.
  • Understand how different business functions, industries, and technologies come together to form solutions.
  • Comfortable and competent with risk-taking.
Demographics And Leadership Destiny

Millennials expect to be developed via opportunities, mentoring, and stretch assignments. However that is hard to come by in top-heavy companies. 

Most millennials think their roles provide little development while most companies report they have excellent or adequate programs for Millennials.

Why Interviewers Ask It

This introductory question serves as an icebreaker to lend an easy flow to the conversation. It helps the recruiter to get to know you in terms of hard and soft skills.

It’s a great op...

How to build your response
  • Present: Talk a little bit about what your current role is, the scope of it, and possibly a recent achievement.
  • Past: Tell the interviewer how you got there and/or mention a past experience that’s relevant to the job and company you’re applying for.
  • Future: Continue with what you’re looking to do next and why you’re interested in this job.
You do not have to respond in this order. Tweak it to suit you. Make sure to tie it to the job and company.
Tailor Your Answer

Interviewers want to know how your answer about yourself is relevant to the position and company you’re applying for.

This is an opportunity to articulate why you’re interested and how your objective fulfills their goals. In order to do that, spend some time researching the company. If your answers resonate with them, it shows that you really understand the role.