How much to ask for - Deepstash

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A 30-step plan to getting the raise you deserve

How much to ask for

  • Look at what your role pays industrywide. Online tools can help you learn what the median pay is for industry, position, and location.
  • Avoid asking your colleagues what they're paid.
  • Avoid asking for an outlandish increase. Your boss may feel you are totally out of touch with what you are worth and with the company's budget.
  • Decide on a target percentage increase. Expect a 3% raise if you met expectations or a 10% - 20% if you're exceeding expectations.
  • Know the minimum you'll accept for a new salary and stick to it.
  • Consider if you would be okay with keeping your salary, but receiving other perks.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

A raise
... is a recognition that you’re now contributing at a higher level than when your salary was last set. 

A raise isn’t a favor or a gift; it’s a way for employers to pay fair market valu...

It’s normal to ask

It’s not greedy or entitled to ask for a raise.  Unless you work somewhere truly dysfunctional, it’s understood that you work for money. This is okay.

  • you’re not asking for an amount that’s wildly out of sync with the market for your work, and 
  • you have a track record of strong work.
Be emotionally intelligent about your timing

You shouldn’t ask to talk about your salary when your manager is especially harried or having a bad day or nervous about impending budget cuts. 

On the other hand, if you’ve just saved the day with an important client or garnered rave reviews for a high-profile project, or if your boss has seemed particularly pleased with you lately, now might be a particularly good time to make the request.

The right time to ask
  • How is the financial health of the company? If the company is not doing well, this is not the time to ask for a raise. 
  • How is your manager’s workload? If your manag...
Get salary trends

Every job has a market value. 

  • Compare what you’re currently being paid to the trends you find.

  • Consider your education, years of experience, years you’ve worked for your current employer and any specialized skills or attributes you bring to the table. 

  • Make a list of your accomplishments, taking note of which ones added the most value to the organization

  • Identify a salary range or percentage increase in pay that you’d be happy with. 

Set a meeting

Meet in person and in private. 

You should approach asking for a raise with the same level of seriousness you would have for a job interview or an important presentation, and you should dress accordingly. 

Your Final Decision

While making your final decision, keep in mind that:

  • You are clear about your deadline for signing the job offer.
  • Assert your deadline continually.
  • U...
Companies Love Negotiating

Companies like you to submit early in the negotiation and be done with it, so it's best not to fall in their traps and pressure tactics.

Respectfully moving forward, showing transparency and maturity signals to the company that you are not just playing games, and are moving towards a final decision. Being honest, open and communicative is the key.

Negotiating is all about relationship, with communication being the bedrock.

Not Just About Money
  • There are various dimensions in a job to be motivated by, not just what you get paid. Your training period, kind of work, kind of team, and the other things you value, like work-life balance, for instance.
  • You also need to understand what the company values. Salary is a recurring cost, that increases over time while being a subject of gossip due to inequality. A joining bonus is a one-time expense and isn't public.
  • There are other perks to negotiate for, like relocation bonus, which can be easier to arrange.