5. Evaluate - Deepstash
5. Evaluate

5. Evaluate

Have the part evaluate these new choices.

Are they acceptable?

Will they be as good as or better than the previous behavior?

It needs to be willing to try them out for the next month or longer if appropriate. The key here is negotiation. If the part with the unwanted behavior is not happy with these alternatives, it is unlikely to give them a go. If you have ever agreed to something because you were bullied into it, you’ll know how important willing commitment is. If the alternatives are not acceptable, go back to step 4 for better choices.

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MORE IDEAS FROM The Six Step Reframe Technique

2. Establish Communication

Establish communication with the part creating the unwanted behavior or response. Ask if it would be willing to communicate consciously. This communication might be a sensation somewhere in their/your body, a picture, voice or sound.When you get a signal, first thank the part for responding. When we have fought against particular behaviors, they can feel alienated, so it’s useful to be polite.

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NLP REFRAMING

Bandler and Grinder developed the six step reframe technique from their study of Milton Erickson  (ideomotor signals) and Virginia Satir ‘s work with parts. They included it in their book Frogs into Princes

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3. Find a Positive Intention

If a neighbor repeatedly told you what a worthless lazy bum you were for not mowing your lawn more often, would it inspire you to mow? I have no idea why many of us think shaming works to change behavior. It doesn’t work for me.

Assuming that this aspect of self has a positive intention can create rapport and therefore makes it more willing to cooperate.

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6. Check for Objections

Check for objections with other parts with an ecology check and future pacing. When we change behaviors, we can affect other people and aspects of ourselves. Even changes we think are fabulous have unintended consequences. We get our new car, but our camping gear doesn’t fit in the boot.If there are objections, put them through the same process from step 2 – what is the positive intention etc?

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When we are young, we try out different behaviors and some of them work. We keep the ones that work, even when times change and those responses may not be the most useful ones. Throwing a tantrum at 4 might get us what we want, at 44 it probably won’t work so well.

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1. Identify the Issue

The first step is:

Identify a troubling behavior or response, something you would rather not do or feel.

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3. Find the Positive Intention

Find the positive intention. Ask the part “What do you want? What positive thing are you trying to do for me? The key here is to recognize the difference between the parts intention and the way it is going about getting it.

Have you ever tried to be helpful and the person misunderstood your intention and got annoyed? How does it make you feel? Are you likely to help a second time? Our unconscious parts feel the same. Here they are doing the best they can to achieve something for you. Is there thanks or even appreciation? We might have a long history of fighting and shaming this response.

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4. Ask for Help

Ask for help from their/your creative part to create three alternative ways to get the intended outcome.

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Behind every behavior is a positive intention – this is one of the basic NLP presuppositions. Motives drive behavior. Our brains do nothing without some (usually unconscious) purpose.

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RELATED IDEA

FBI's 5-Step Negotiation Strategy
  1. Active Listening: Just defending your proposal puts you at odds with your counterpart. Listening "without judging" and ensuring the other knows you're doing so lets you understand their value system and then adapt your proposal to fit it.
  2. Empathy: Understand why the other feels a certain way and then connect by sharing those feelings. 
  3. Rapport: After empathizing, respond with words that will resonate with the person you are negotiating with.
  4. Influence: After showing an understanding and willingness to help them achieve their objective. Now, you have leverage to problem solve with and help them reframe their objectives.
  5. Behavioral Change: Finally, you propose alternatives that stand a chance to achieve an acceptable outcome.

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Emotional Contagion: Emotions Are Contagious

Emotional contagion is a phenomenon that occurs when a person or groups emotions and behaviours affect the emotions and behaviours of some other person or group. This can be negative or positive.

We often mimic or imitate the emotional expressions (smiles and frowns) of other people without even realizing it. Mimicry and copying the body language, voice or facial expressions of other people is natural among social creatures, due to 'mirror neurons’ in the cerebral cortex region of the brain.

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Control stimuli

Acting independently begins with what you let into your mind—meaning what comes in from your environment. If you are lacking agency, it’s likely your attention is being hijacked and you need to figure out how to restore it.

To help you increase your control, practice going to quiet and screen-free spaces to escape overstimulation.

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