Death Valley National Park - Deepstash
Death Valley National Park

Death Valley National Park

Death Valley National Park is located in Eastern California. During the summer it is one of the hottest places on Earth where the highest recorded temperature of it reached 54.4°C or 130F.

However, whenever the hottest temperature gets updated a historical artifact claiming that the hottest temperature it reached is actually 57°C or 134F. This was assessed and is claimed as an observer error.

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MORE IDEAS FROM What the 'hottest day on record' really means | Popular Science

Why Temperatures Matter

Our systems for measuring temperature are more accurate now with all the automated readings and less of the "to decipher" handwritten records. Although there is still a chance for an anomaly to occur, it's pretty rare.

What happens now is that due to the temperatures rising worldwide and with the data we have, we cannot and should not ignore the wrath of intensified weather.

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How We Record Temperatures

The Automated Surface Observing Systems (asos) is what we use to collect data of temperatures, precipitation, cloud cover, wind speed, and pressure.

We have been using the asos since the mid-90s and on average these send data reports every 20 minutes.

Official weather-taking themometers are different from the ones that people install in their houses. These official thermometers need to be shielded from external factors that can influence the temperature outcome.

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RELATED IDEA

Africa

Kebili, Tunisia, located on the northern edge of the Sahara Desert, reached 131.0°F (55.0°C) in July of 1931.

Asia

In 2016, Mitribah, Kuwait saw a high of 129°F (53.9°C).

Turbat, Pakistan reached 128.7°F (53.7°C) in May of 2017.

Tirat Zvi, Israel, reported 129.2°F (54.0°C) on June 21, 1942, but it was not officially recorded at the time.

Australia

In the Stuart Range of Oodnadatta, South Australia, nearly in the centre of the country, 123.0°F (50.7°C) was reached on January 2, 1960.

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Thermogenesis

A cold body uses more energy to keep itself warm than a warm body.

When we are cold, we shiver — the muscles involuntary contract to generate warmth. The body may also activate "brown fat", a kind of fat tissue whose primary function is heat production. Brown fat burns calories to generate heat. 

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Getting closer to the sun

Until now, NASA's Helios 2 was the vessel that has got the closest to the sun: in 1976, it came within 27 million miles of the surface of the sun.

This is about to change, as NASA is planning on making its brand new Parker Solar Probe have a path that will take it 3.83 million miles away from the sun. The journey will have as main purpose to gather as much information as possible on the yellow star.

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