Types of Loneliness - Deepstash
Types of Loneliness

Types of Loneliness

1. Interpersonal Loneliness

This is the most common kind of loneliness children and adults experience. This is where a person is socially isolated or perceives him or herself as cut off from a significant other.

2. Social Loneliness

Social loneliness is where children or adults are excluded, rejected, or perceives themselves to be disconnected from a group or community.

3. Cultural Loneliness

When a person feels a disconnect from their own culture or the mainstream culture so much so that they feel they don’t belong anywhere.

2

STASHED IN:

22

MORE IDEAS FROM THE ARTICLE

Strategies to Reduce Loneliness

3. Seek a four-legged friend. 

Consider adopting a pet. Creating a bond with a dog, cat, or another animal companion can ease feelings of loneliness and improve well-being.

4. Unplug from computer/phone/social media and connect in real life.

Remember to disconnect from technology and put yourself into the real world. Studies show that offline interactions have more positive social effects than online activities. Young adults and teens who spend a lot of time on social media are twice as likely to feel lonely.

4

STASHED IN:

21

Dangers of Loneliness
  • Lonely individuals are at higher risk for disability.
  • Loneliness puts individuals at greater risk of cognitive decline.
  • Loneliness raises the risk by 32% for stubbiness
  • Loneliness raises the risk of poor physical health in children.
  • Loneliness increases suicide in the geriatric population.
  • Loneliness increases suicidal ideation and suicide attempts in teenagers.

2

STASHED IN:

20

Loneliness

Everyone from time to time has felt lonely. Physically, feel hollow and empty inside. As if something is missing within. Emotionally, feeling alone, sad, and untethered.

5

STASHED IN:

19

Dangers of Loneliness

3

STASHED IN:

21

Types of Loneliness

4. Intellectual Loneliness

Where a child or an adult feels a lack of intellectual stimulation and connectedness to others or a group.

5. Psychological Loneliness

When trauma disrupts a person’s sense of belongingness, loneliness can result. Because no one else can understand the trauma, social withdrawal can occur.

6. Existential Loneliness

When morality is faced by a child or an adult, an isolating sense of loneliness can develop.

2

STASHED IN:

23

Strategies to Reduce Loneliness

1. Ask for help. 

Reach out to friends and family with a phone call or a personal visit. Talk about feelings of isolation to cue in loved ones. If you have a significant other, tell him or her that you’re feeling lonely in the relationshipSharing feelings helps open the door to greater social involvement.

2. Find purpose. 

Join a local community, church, or temple group that dovetails with some of your interests. Consider volunteering as another great way to make new friends and socialize.


4

STASHED IN:

21

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

GET THE APP:

RELATED IDEAS

A public health problem

Most people consider loneliness a personal problem to be figured out by individuals. 

However, a paper published in the American Journal of Public Health identified high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, disability, cognitive decline, and depression among the conditions affected by loneliness. What we have is a public health problem.

No emerging technology or drug exists on the horizon to cure loneliness. 

4

STASHED IN:

167

Loneliness

Loneliness is a universal human emotion that is both complex and unique to each individual. because it has no single common cause, the prevention and treatment of this potentially damaging state of mind can vary dramatically.

For example, a lonely child who struggles to make friends at school has different needs than a lonely older adult whose spouse has recently died.

17

STASHED IN:

63

Loneliness, What?

Everyone experiences loneliness at some time in their life. It could come after a divorce or a break up, or after moving to a new area, or when we have spent too much time on our own, whether that’s due to age, illness, or, as with the COVID-19 pandemic, social restrictions.

1

STASHED IN:

10