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4 Steps To Becoming More Adaptable To Change

Experiment And Learn

Complexity calls for a series of safe-to-fail experiments–little bets that we can use to nudge the system in the desired direction. Instead of picking a final destination and trying to close the gaps, try finding places for experimentation and learning.

The experiments should be small, inexpensive, and most importantly they should be things you can learn from.

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4 Steps To Becoming More Adaptable To Change

4 Steps To Becoming More Adaptable To Change

https://www.fastcompany.com/3043294/4-steps-to-becoming-more-adaptable-to-change

fastcompany.com

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Key Ideas

Experiment And Learn

Complexity calls for a series of safe-to-fail experiments–little bets that we can use to nudge the system in the desired direction. Instead of picking a final destination and trying to close the gaps, try finding places for experimentation and learning.

The experiments should be small, inexpensive, and most importantly they should be things you can learn from.

Consider The Bigger Picture

We tend to pull things apart and solve the pieces one at a time. But complex systems have too many variables for a reductionist approach to work perfectly.

If you find yourself being drawn to the minutiae, try to find the patterns. When you feel yourself bouncing back and forth between two details, instead of thinking of them as opposites, see what balance you can strike between the two sides.

Accept Multiple Perspectives

You need to seek out different perspectives and not try to convince anyone that you’re right.

You can tell you’re not taking someone’s perspective into consideration if you think of him as  not getting it. Try holding back on forming an opinion and instead actively listen to those you have written off as a lost cause.

Ask Different Questions

Ask unusual questions when seeking for new answers, else you get the usual answers. 

Push yourself to think what’s surprising, what you are ignoring and what you thing might be of use. Different questions open you up to new possibilities and create a more flexible, agile mind-set.

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The downsides of too much adapting

The downsides to always adapting, always flexible, always changing gears could lead to a lack of direction and commitment. In turn, a lack of direction could lead to failure.

We don’t want to entertain the possibility that it might fail. We just imagine that things are definitely going to work.

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Systematic approach
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Study the problem first

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Get close and collect information about how the problem is manifesting.  Understand where the problem does and doesn’t happen, when the problem started, and how often the problem occurs to generate critical insight for the problem-solving effort.

Question for great answers
  • Don’t look for solutions immediately; Keep redefining the problem until you arrive at the root cause.
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  • Find a way to connect the dots. Make better analogies. One good analogy is worth three hours of discussion.

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Looking both ways

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Ask questions

It helps you preserve your neutrality.
It is effective in getting others to pause, reflect, and get clear with themselves about what the problem actually is. 
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Be mindful during a conflict situation
  • All issues are best dealt with as soon as all involved are calm.
  • Start with one-on-one conversations to get the details of the issue from both perspectives.
  • Recognize that there is no objective reality of the situation.
Probing questions to ask

Once you have the basics of what happened and how long it has been going on, you can move on to asking more probing questions:

  • What is the other person saying?
  • How does what you've been hearing go against your values?
  • What is the difference between your two perspectives?
  • What aspects of this conflict do you believe you're responsible for?
  • Can you put yourself in your coworker's shoes? How does she feel?
  • If we were to think outside of the box, how could this issue be resolved?
  • What will happen to you if this issue isn't resolved through this discussion?
  • What would you offer to do or change to help resolve this issue? What would you like in return?
We all make bad decisions

While we may not like to admit this, we all are making a lot of bad decisions, be it our personal lives, careers or in our jobs. Here is what research says about making good decisions:

The right information, not more

If there is too much information, we tend to make the wrong decision, and even if our decision is well-researched and considered right, we end up dissatisfied. 

The right information, even if less, provides clarity to make the right decision.

Gut feelings vs logic

A gut feeling, or an instinct, is often the right path, and points towards the right decision.

Ultra-rational, logical and unemotional decision-making does not guarantee that the decision taken will be the right one.

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