Deciding On What To Focus - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

Getting to Simple: How Experts Figure What to Focus On

Deciding On What To Focus

To know what's coming easily to you, what you’re performing well on, pay attention and measure the indicators of success in the chosen activity.

At some point, you won't need more information, you will need to make a choice between sticking with the activity or switching to a new one.

75 SAVES


EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Productivity is simplicity
True productivity is putting the right things on your to-do list, exclusively answering emails that matter, and only taking meetings that will propel you forwards. 

It’s less about “how” and more about “what”. When you’re focused on unimportant objectives, you feel painfully stuck. It’s like trudging along on a treadmill; sure, you’re running, but you’re not actually getting anywhere. On the contrary, when you’ve had a deeply productive day, you’ll know it.

Helping others
Givers, those who are other-focused, paying more attention to what people need from them, dominate the top of the success ladder.

Productivity shouldn’t only be the pursuit of self-improvement, but also a mission to improve the lives and the work of people we encounter.

Prioritize the work that excites you
Minimize the things you dread and meetings you don't want to attend as much as possible: say “no”, delegate, and automate.

This leaves you to make room on your calendar for discussions that exhilarate you.

When what you spend your time on is congruent with your interests and values, progress feels conveniently close.

The basics to succeed in the gym:
  1. Commit to the long-term process.
  2. Don't treat exercise as something to do when it's convenient. 
  3. Great results come from great focus, not a great variety.
  4. Start light and train for volume before intensity.
  5.  Make SLOW progress each week.
  6. Record your workouts. What gets measured, gets managed.
Don't focus on the short-term results
  • The goal is not to lose 40 pounds in the next 12 weeks, but to regain your health for the rest of your life.
  • The goal is not to bench press 300 pounds, but to be the guy who never misses a workout.
  • The goal is not to sacrifice everything to get your fastest time in next month's race, but to be faster next year than you are today.
Focus on the best exercises

People often waste time in the gym bouncing around without any real goal, doing a little bit of this machine and a little bit of that machine

The simple rule that will always guide you toward the best exercises: the more an exercise makes you move, the bigger the benefits it will deliver. 

Habits or Skills

Decide whether what you're trying to improve is mostly a habit or mostly a skill: if your main problem is with doing something you already know how to do, but doing it consistently, that’s probably a habit. If your main problem is not knowing how to do something well enough, that’s probably a skill.

Improving a habit

This process has 3 main parts: 

  • Define the habit you want to form clearly and consistently;
  • Condition it until it is relatively easy to maintain. 
  • Maintain the habit by monitoring it. If you slip, push to reassert the habit quickly.
Improving skills

The best strategy for getting better at skills is deliberate practice. A good way to work on this is to divide it into 3: 

  • Practice the skill. 
  • Get timely feedback on how well you’re performing.
  • Focus on your weak points with selective drills and constrained practice.