Justifying Your Job - Deepstash

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13 Signs It's Time to Quit Your Job

Justifying Your Job

"My co-workers are nasty and condescending, but at least my salary is decent.

"I don't make any money but at least there's free coffee and snacks in the office.

Do you feel deep down you know the cons outweigh the pros? You can find a job that offers more positive than negative, and you should get ready to start looking for it.

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Before You Call It Quits
  • Make sure you've identified the real causes of your unhappiness. Keep a diary of events and problems.
  • Give it a chance. Many things, like diets, require time to work out.
  • Try m...
Quit When...
  • You're consistently experiencing more frustration than reward.
  • You can't envision a possible solution or continuing this way.
  • Spending time on this keeps you from more rewarding endeavors or seriously damages your well-being.
  • You're staying for the wrong reasons.
  • Your friends keep telling you to quit.
  • Don't think of quitting as either good or bad in itself or a reflection of your self-worth.
Following protocol

Schedule a time with your supervisor to break the news. Be aware that sharing the news with the office grapevine might cause the news to leak prematurely before you formally give notice.

It's...

Your future-focused "why"

Your supervisor will probably ask you why you are leaving.

Make sure your reason for leaving is opportunity-focused and aspirational and not because you are running away from something. Reasons may be taking on a more prominent role, learning new skills, working in a new industry or relocation.

Weighting counteroffers

Research found that while 58% of employers extend counteroffers, the average employee who accepts them stays less than two years in a company.

Keep the focus on your new opportunities and suggest that you remain in touch and explore the chance to return at a future time.

All areas of your life are affected

When your job is affecting your mental and emotional health, so that anger and depression overwhelm you or bleed over into other areas of your life, it’s time to consider a change.

A toxic workplace

It can have a negative impact on your happiness and job performance.

Studies found that ostracism, bad leadership, harassment, and bullying have direct negative effects on job productivity. Also, being in a job you hate is worse for your health than being unemployed.

Not aligned with your values

If your job is not aligned with your values, you'll end up questioning the possibility of doing it for the next 15, 20, or 30 years.

The good part about it is the fact that this will point you in the right direction, where changes need to be made.