Put a Deadline on Your Thoughts - Deepstash

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Put a Deadline on Your Thoughts

To avoid over-ruminating about a decision, give yourself a time frame to think about it. 

If it’s a small issue such as what paint color to paint your office, perhaps a deadline of 10 minutes is sufficient; whereas a larger decision such as whether to accept a new job offer in another city may warrant a couple of days of thought.

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MORE IDEAS FROM THE SAME ARTICLE

Letting the inactive parts of your brain work through the problem can let the answer come to you when you’re not expecting it. 

When you find yourself overthinking about a problem, try moving on to another subject or changing your physical space by going for a walk, or moving your la...

Dwelling on a problem, thinking “this is horrible, I can’t handle this” or rehashing things that happened in the past are an unproductive use of your time.

Thinking about what steps you can take to improve the situation or actively thinking of a solution to the pro...

To avoid thinking about problems all day long, schedule a specific time where you give yourself the freedom to think about the issue you need to make a decision about. 

If thoughts about the issue creep into your brain before your scheduled thinking time, tell your...

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If you’re proactively trying to gain a new perspective, you might find thinking about an issue is helpful. If you’re repetitively thinking about how you wish things were different or imagining all the things that could go wrong, you’re overthinking.

  1. Is there a solution to thi...

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1. Notice When You’re Stuck in Your Head

Start paying attention to the way you think so you can become aware of the problem.

When you’re replaying events in your mind over and over, or worrying about things you can’t control, acknowledge that this isn’t productive. Thinking is only helpful when it leads to positive action....

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Destructive Thought Patterns

Overthinking often involves two destructive thought patterns—ruminating and incessant worrying.

Ruminating involves dwelling on the past.

Persistent worrying involves negative—often catastrophic—predictions about the future.

Like all habits, changing your destructive thought pat...

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