Work post-pandemic - Deepstash
Work post-pandemic

Work post-pandemic

Some people want to work for high performing teams and be great leaders and teammates. But others don't want their lives defined by their work.

They prefer to pursue careers that provide more autonomy and freedom, even if it means getting paid less or letting go of their job titles. They realise that they don't need to be in an office five or six days per week to be effective - they are far more effective working half as much from home.

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MORE IDEAS FROM Why it’s time to stop saying “my work is my life”​

Businesses will need to rethink how they engage, motivate and support their employees.

  • Companies will need to explore different employment contracts, such as the 11-month contract of the 4-day workweek. Maybe even focus on effectiveness based on quality, not time.
  • The future office space might be local pop-ups and offsite venues where employees meet periodically.
  • Or maybe it still includes office life and regular working hours.

In the end, the future of work may be about having a choice.

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  • In the 1700s and 1800s, workdays were long, and conditions were rough and sometimes dangerous. Older adults worked 12-hour days well past the last quarter of their lives.
  • In the late 1800s, the age of mass production caused improved working conditions as businesses scaled, and the idea of working and retiring emerged. Now, you worked for 8 to 10 hours a day and could spend the rest of your time with family and friends.
  • With the digital revolution, these worlds started to merge out of choice.

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RELATED IDEA

The 1950s workplace - the open-plan office

At first, office layouts were influenced by the production or factory line. Rows of desks fitted tightly together, but managers and executives had private offices with windows so they could supervise workers.

In the 1950s, the workplace design style became less rigid. The emphasis was placed on meeting the needs of the workforce with a more fluid design. It resulted in a more social environment where collaboration between teams increased.

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Technology helped to normalised the lack of boundaries in our lives. We are attached to our phones. With the lockdowns, office closures and more limited social lives have added to the norm.

  • A global study shows that the average daily working time increased by 30 minutes a day in 2020.
  • A UK poll found that more than 30% of remote workers find it harder to switch off from work during the pandemic.
  • A similar proportion of people are working more unpaid hours.

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Our culture claims that work is unavoidable and natural. The idea that the world can be freed from work, wholly or in part, has been suppressed for as long as capitalism has existed.

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