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8 Really Effective Ways to Squash Fear

Enlarge your comfort zone

The more we stick with what's familiar, the more frightened we'll be every time we encounter the unfamiliar. 

Seek out unfamiliar territory--try new things, stretch yourself professionally, risk being seen as a fool.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

8 Really Effective Ways to Squash Fear

8 Really Effective Ways to Squash Fear

https://www.inc.com/minda-zetlin/8-really-effective-tricks-to-boost-your-courage.html

inc.com

8

Key Ideas

All fears are not created equal

Some are useful, and some are useless fears that you can't or shouldn't do anything about. 

They sap your strength for no reason, and you should put those fears in their place. Worrying about a comet striking Earth falls in this category.

Fear can harm you

In scuba diving, for instance, fear can cause you to breathe too fast, swim too hard, move too suddenly, fail to take note of your surroundings, or rise too quickly toward the surface.

Knowing that fear has the potential to harm you can help you set it aside. Fold up that fear, put it in a box, and promise you'll get back to it later at a less dangerous time.

Fear and chemicals

You may think it's your judgment deciding that something is dangerous and you should be afraid, but what actually happens is that fear chemicals are flooding into your brain.

Experiments have shown that fear can be induced artificially by injecting certain chemicals. Do the chemicals know what you should and shouldn't be afraid of? They don't. You do.

Enlarge your comfort zone

The more we stick with what's familiar, the more frightened we'll be every time we encounter the unfamiliar. 

Seek out unfamiliar territory--try new things, stretch yourself professionally, risk being seen as a fool.

Engage your cognition

One good way to take back your brain from chemicals that are flooding it is to do something that engages your prefrontal cortex, the part of your brain that reasons

Focus on problem solving, such as doing a crossword puzzle, bookkeeping, responding to business emails, or other such emotionally neutral activity.

Name your fears

Naming your fears always takes some of the power out of them. 

Telling someone what you're most afraid of can be a great way to cut those fears down. It's also very helpful to write them down. It will cause your brain to come up with solutions and backup plans.

Stop and breathe

Simply stop for a few moments and focus on your breath. Filling your brain with oxygen will help it drive out fear.

Embrace your fear, then let it go

Give yourself permission to wallow in your worries for a specified time. When it is over, tell yourself that you are now finished with useless fear.

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Fear Is Real

Fear is everywhere and yet fear can be overcome, controlled and can even be a power for good.

Accept your fear relative to you.

Get Some Perspective
  • Are you really at risk?
  • Will this kill you?
  • If the worse was to happen what would it be?
  • Could that really happen?

  • If the worse did happen, how would you recover?
  • If the worse were to happen, what would you need to do next?

By seeing fear as not the end destination but part of being human, you can see through its wily evil ways and move forward.

Hold a Hand

Think of someone you can always rely on, be it your friend, partner, colleague, parent, sibling and say: “Right I need to deal with this, and I’m going to need you to help me.” 

They, in turn, will feel valued, loved and respected.

2 more ideas

Fear of success

It's a very real but often misunderstood struggle. The key thing to realize is that, in most cases, the fear is about the consequences of success, not the success itself. 

This fear like...

What fear of success looks like
  • Fear of success usually doesn’t mean a literal fear of success. People fear the results and consequences of making lots of money, for example, not the money itself.
  • Fear of success is often learned at a young age.
  • Fear of success is maintained (and made worse) by avoidance.
  • Fear of success is painful. It brings a lot of anxiety.
  • Most people who are afraid of success are embarrassed by their fear.
Work through your fear of success
  • Validate your fear of success by understanding its origins.
  • Track your avoidance strategies related to fear of success.
  • Face your fears of success (the smart way).
  • Get professional help from a cognitive behavioral therapist.
Anxiety is rewarding

Each time we worry and nothing bad happens, our mind connects worry with preventing harm:

Worry → nothing bad happens.

And the takeaway is, "It's a good thing I worried."&nbs...

Beliefs about worry
  • If I worry, I'll never have a bad surprise.
  • It's safer if I worry. We believe that the act of worrying itself somehow lowers the likelihood of a dreaded outcome. 
  • I show I care by worrying. We need to distinguish between caring about a situation and worrying needlessly and fruitlessly about it. 
  • Worrying motivates me. We need to differentiate between unproductive worry and productive concern and problem solving.
  • Worrying helps me solve problems. Extreme worry is more likely to interfere with problem-solving. 
Tools to assist us with worry
  • Calm the nervous system with guided muscle relaxation, meditation, and exercise. 
  • Notice when you're worrying and any beliefs that reinforce worry.  Awareness of the process gives us more choice in how we respond.
  • Embrace uncertainty. Most of the things we care about in life involve uncertainty. It takes considerable practice to begin to embrace it.
  • Live in the present. Practice focusing your attention on the present in everyday activities like taking a shower, walking, or talking with a friend, as well as in more formal practices like meditation or yoga.
  • When we face our fears head-on, they tend to diminish. Deliberately accept what you're afraid of: "It's possible I'll miss my flight."