Judged based on looks - Deepstash

Judged based on looks

A large study examining crimes tried in courts found that physically attractive defendants often come off lighter than unattractive ones. Other studies found that even when crimes are not real, test subjects gave longer sentences to uglier people than attractive ones.

Some studies found that smiling people tend to get lower sentences. The expression of remorse can also influence a juries decision.

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MORE IDEAS FROM Beauty bias: hopefully the judge finds you attractive

People assume that good looking people are as great as they look.

  • Some studies suggest that the beauty bias can be overcome in the courtroom by spending more time considering the problem of guilt.
  • In the workplace, a standardised approach should be taken when hiring someone, such as assuring that meaningful things, like qualifications and evidence, and highlighted while downplaying trivialities like looks. 

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Keynesian Economics

John Maynard Keynes (1883-1946) was interested in the level of national income and the volume of employment rather than in the equilibrium of the firm or the allocation of resources. 

He was still concerned with the problem of demand and supply, but “demand” in the Keynesian model means the total level of effective demand in the economy, while “supply” means the country’s capacity to produce. When effective demand falls short of productive capacity, the result is unemployment and depression; conversely, when demand exceeds the capacity to produce, the result is inflation.

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The Hindsight Bias

A bias that many people including historians, experts and physicians encounter is the hindsight bias, which makes them think they knew how an event would turn out before it happened. It is the tendency for people to perceive past outcomes as having been more predictable than they actually were.

This phenomenon has been linked to distortion of memory, which unconsciously makes us understand the world based on our outlook.

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Homo Narrativus

We, humans, seek stories.

We are essentially ‘story finders’ looking for meaning, narrative and shape in everything around us. We tend to not believe in improbable stories and tend to create story threads out of thin air, making them real and believable.

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