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The bright side: how to challenge negative beliefs

Challenging beliefs

The first step is to become aware of which of these negative belief patterns you are susceptible to. Keep a journal and record your negative thoughts.

Ask yourself the following questions each time you experience negative beliefs.

  • What is my evidence for thinking this way?
  • Is there any evidence that doesn't support this belief?
  • Could there be other ways of interpreting this event?

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

The bright side: how to challenge negative beliefs

The bright side: how to challenge negative beliefs

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2009/mar/08/negative-beliefs-distorted-thinking

theguardian.com

2

Key Ideas

Examples of distorted thinking

  • Seeing the world in terms of black and white extremes. 
  • A tendency to magnify our faults and minimize our achievements. 
  • Taking an isolated event and assuming that all other events will follow the same pattern. 
  • Jumping to conclusions.
  • Catastrophising: 

Challenging beliefs

The first step is to become aware of which of these negative belief patterns you are susceptible to. Keep a journal and record your negative thoughts.

Ask yourself the following questions each time you experience negative beliefs.

  • What is my evidence for thinking this way?
  • Is there any evidence that doesn't support this belief?
  • Could there be other ways of interpreting this event?

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Our emotions are always mediated by some form of thinking. 

If our thoughts determine how we feel, that means how we habitually think will determine how we habitually feel.

Mind Reading

It happens when we assume we understand what other people are thinking without any real evidence.

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Beliefs As Self-Fulfilling Prophecies

What you believe influences the way you interpret events, how you feel, and how you behave. And much of the time, those beliefs turn into self-fulfilling prophecies.

Give Up Self-Limiting Beliefs
Challenge your beliefs by testing them to see if they're really true.
  • If you believe you're too socially awkward to make friends, ask yourself "What would I be doing if I were socially savvy?" Then, use a skill called, 'acting as if.' Act as if you were a socially savvy person.
  • That doesn't mean you need to be a phony. Instead, behave in a way that brings out another side of your personality.
Challenging Your Beliefs Takes Time

It's likely that everyone has a few self-limiting beliefs. 

To discover yours, spend some time thinking about your potential and assessing the assumptions you make about yourself that keep you from living your dreams.

It's likely that your beliefs, rather than your lack of ability, could be the biggest hurdle.

The backfire effect

Is a cognitive bias and it means that showing people evidence which proves that they are wrong is often ineffective, and can actually end up backfiring, by causing them to support their o...

Why the backfire effect appears

People experience  as a result of the process that they go through when they encounter information that contradicts their preexisting beliefs.

When people argue strongly enough against unwelcome information, they end up, in their mind, with more arguments that support their original stance.

Reducing other people’s backfire effect

If you’re trying to explain to someone the issues with their stance, you can mitigate the backfire effect by presenting new information in a way that encourages the other person to consider and internalize that information, instead of rejecting it outright.

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