Learning a new language - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

deepstash

Beta

How to stay mentally fit

Learning a new language

Speaking more than two languages has a protective effect on memory in seniors who practice foreign languages over their lifetime or at the time of the study.

157 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

How to stay mentally fit

How to stay mentally fit

https://www.ft.com/content/50b6eb46-576c-11e8-806a-808d194ffb75

ft.com

2

Key Ideas

Brain drain

Relying on tech to “do it for you” can make us mentally lazy. 

Research by University College London into the brains of trainee taxi drivers showed that those who had passed the famous “Knowledge” test to learn routes across the city’s 25,000 streets and thousands of places of interest had a greater volume of grey matter in their posterior hippocampus — the nerve cells in the brain where processing takes place — than when they started.

Learning a new language

Speaking more than two languages has a protective effect on memory in seniors who practice foreign languages over their lifetime or at the time of the study.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Never stop learning

Research shows that people with more education have a greater cognitive reserve and this works as a protection in the face of mental decline.

But there's a twist to it: educated people t...

Crosswords

Cognitive activities like crossword puzzles, reading or playing music may delay memory decline among people who eventually developed dementia.

Stereotype threat

It happens when a person is in a situation where they are anxious that they may conform to a negative stereotype aimed at his or her social group.

Positive stereotypes, or success on previous memory tasks, can help combat this negativity. 

6 more ideas

Invest in your emotional health

Staying mentally and emotionally healthy helps us face challenges, stresses, and setbacks. It also equips us to be more functional in our daily lives. 

A person who is mentally and emoti...

Take care of your physical health

Physical health plays an important role in ensuring that you are mentally healthy. 

You can stay healthy by eating well, getting adequate rest and exercise, and actively taking care of your physical health. 

Exercise and get some fresh air

Daily exposure to sunlight helps avoid depression.

Physical activity is also beneficial for the mind. Exercise boosts energy, reduces stress and mental fatigue. 

8 more ideas

Being overweight affects the brain

A diet high in saturated fats and sugars affects your blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar levels. It also affects the parts of the brain that are important to memory.

  • A 20...
Memory problems

Obese people find it more difficult to pick apart spatial, item, and temporal memory, as well as the ability to integrate them.

If you're obese, you might be up to 20 percent more likely not to remember where you put your keys.

Changing eating habits

The diet of obese people degrades their memory and makes them more likely to overeat, a study revealed.

Making a meal more memorable may help to eat less bad stuff. If you watch TV while you eat, you'll eat more than planned.

Difficult work and brain health

Fast thinking, prioritizing, and decision making are actually making your brain stronger and preparing it for top performance for years to come. 

The things you struggle with but ...

Maximize your brain's performance

Building a brain-exercise routine will probably be successful if it mirrors the most successful ways to create any other routine.

The answer to maxing out your brain’s performance abilities for the rest of your life lies in how you exercise it—just like your body.

Strengthen your mind every day
  • At work: Attack your big challenges first. Don’t waste your mornings with routine, repetitive tasks.
  • At home: Take on more challenging hobbies. Do a crossword puzzle, play Sudoku, make home improvement plans.
  • In relationships: Don’t shy away from difficult conversations with your partner or friends. Discuss big ideas and how to bring them to life.
Strengthening the mind
Strengthening the mind

Neuroscience research shows you can keep your brain sharp in much the same way you keep your body fit.

  • At work: Attack your big challenges first. Don’t waste your mornings with routine, ...
Attention = Focusing + Ignoring

Paying attention involves two separate distinct brain functions: 

  1. “enhancement” - our ability to focus on things that matter) 
  2. “suppression” - our ability to ...
Suppressing distraction gets harder with age

Our ability to filter out distractions, not our concentration, diminishes with age. 

As we grow older we get more and more distracted. 

Less visual clutter to eliminate distractions

When your eyes are closed, your brain isn’t working as hard to filter out visual information. So: 

  • Use one screen, one browser window, and one computer program at a time.
  • Keep your physical and virtual desktop tidy.

one more idea

Body Mass Index (BMI)
Body Mass Index (BMI)

Body Mass Index (BMI) is a mathematical formula and divides a person's weight by the square of their height. The answer falls into one of eight categories and indicates the per...

Where BMI Goes Wrong
  • BMI doesn't distinguish between body fat and muscle mass. Muscle weighs about 18 percent more than the same amount of fat. So, according to BMI, the muscled person is more overweight than a sedentary person.
  • BMI is also not reliable to use on elderly adults, who continue to lose muscle and bone mass with age. An overweight older adult may appear to be within a normal BMI range.
  • The BMI calculation is based on Caucasian body types and may not be appropriate for people of other ethnicities.
BMI Correlate to Health

A person whose BMI indicates they are overweight or obese is generally considered unhealthy. But 2016 research suggested that this was incorrect for 75 million Americans.

  • Researchers found that 54 million Americans that were classed as overweight or obese were perfectly healthy when they considered the cardiometabolic measures (blood pressure, blood sugar, cholesterol, etc.)
  • 21 Million people were classed normal in terms of BMI, but other cardiometabolic tests indicated they were unhealthy.
Early Mistakes, Late Start & Future Hurdles.

Savings and investments should be part of a monthly budget even when young or just starting a career.

You cannot save enough if you are waiting until your late 30's before...

Myth vs. Reality in Retirement Planning
  • I’m not that old:  It’s not about NOW but saving for your old days when you can no longer work full time. 
  • I’ll wait for a lump sum is just an excuse to postpone planning or procrastinate.
  • Assumed Family/External Support: It’s better to be prepared for eventualities and have contingency funds in hand.
  • Financial Requirements Decrease: Medical costs increase with age. Inflation and other factors might also come into play.
  • I will not live that long or I won’t retire: People tend to live longer, but they will suffer from medical ailments.
Retirement Goals

To have a secure and financially independent retired life during your golden years with regular post retirement income, a corpus of savings/investments and a safe shelter or home.

one more idea

Your brain can be changed

Neuroscience has shown that the adult brain remains malleable throughout life.

The circuits we use most often become stronger and more efficient — the ones we don't use, shrink and fade away....

How to control a wandering mind

To change anything in the brain, you have to focus your attention on the task at hand. However, most find it challenging to concentrate for long periods of time without daydreaming.

Curb your wandering mind by working out the cause for the wandering. Procrastination is a psychological coping mechanism that kicks in during times of stress.

Brain target
  • The default mode network of our brain, responsible for mind-wandering and creativity, needs to be turned down when we want to work for any length of time.  
  • The brain's dorsal attention network - the part that helps us make decisions and focus on a task - moves into action when we are deliberately focusing on a task.

When people are less able to focus for any length of time, they are leaning more heavily on the left hemisphere of their brain, while the right hemisphere is not working as hard as it should be working.

3 more ideas

Taking good breaks

This is important for your daily productivity. Good breaks can leave us feeling refreshed and energized. It can reduce mental fatigue, boost brain function and keep us on-task for extended periods....

The brain and goal management

The prefrontal cortex of the brain is mainly responsible for goal management. It orchestrates attention, working memory and other cognitive resources to help us get what we want.

For a challenging task, briefly taking our minds off the goal can renew and strengthen motivation. Doing activities that rely on different brain regions is best to restore focus.

Going Natural

Exposure to nature restores the mind. One study showed better working memory scores for people after a walk in a natural environment, but not in an urban setting.

If you are unable to go into nature, find plants, fresh air or a fish tank. Sit down, take a deep breath, and notice the details of nature. Research shows that even looking at some pictures of nature can work.

4 more ideas