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5 Types of Impostor Syndrome and How to Stop Them

The Expert

Experts measure their competence based on “how much” they know or can do. Believing they will never know enough, they fear being exposed as inexperienced or unknowledgeable.

Start practicing just-in-time learning. This means acquiring a skill when you need it–for example if your responsibilities change–rather than hoarding knowledge for (false) comfort.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

5 Types of Impostor Syndrome and How to Stop Them

5 Types of Impostor Syndrome and How to Stop Them

https://www.themuse.com/advice/5-different-types-of-imposter-syndrome-and-5-ways-to-battle-each-one

themuse.com

6

Key Ideas

Impostor Syndrome

It is a psychological phenomenon that reflects the belief that you’re an inadequate and incompetent failure despite evidence that indicates you’re skilled and quite successful.

The Perfectionist

They set the bar excessively high for themselves and when they fail to reach their goals, they experience major self-doubt. For this type, success is rarely satisfying because they believe they could’ve done even better.

But that’s not productive. Learning to celebrate achievements is essential if you want to avoid burnout and find contentment.

The Superwoman/man

Impostor workaholics are actually addicted to the validation that comes from working, not to the work itself. They push themselves to work harder, to measure up with their colleagues.

Start drifting away from external validation. No one should have more power to make you feel good about yourself than you.

The Natural Genius

They judge their competences based on ease and speed as opposed to their efforts. If they take a long time to master something, they feel shame. 

To move past this, try seeing yourself as a work in progress: identify specific, changeable behaviors that you can improve over time. 

The Soloist

Soloists feel as though asking for help will reveal that they're a fraud.

It’s OK to be independent, but not to the extent that you refuse assistance so that you can prove your worth.

The Expert

Experts measure their competence based on “how much” they know or can do. Believing they will never know enough, they fear being exposed as inexperienced or unknowledgeable.

Start practicing just-in-time learning. This means acquiring a skill when you need it–for example if your responsibilities change–rather than hoarding knowledge for (false) comfort.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Impostor Syndrome

Is a psychological phenomenon that reflects the core belief that you are an inadequate, incompetent, and a failure, despite evidence that indicates you're skilled and successful.

Impos...

Causes of the Impostor Syndrome

From a psychological standpoint, it may be influenced by certain factors early in life, particularly the development of certain beliefs and attitude towards success and one's self-worth.

Signs You Have Impostor Syndrome

  • You don't think you deserve success.
  • You think you're a fake and you're going to be found out.
  • You attribute your success to luck.
  • You think you're not special, anyone can do what you do.
  • You can't internalize your success so you credit others for it.
  • You can't accept praise.
  • Failure is not an option.
  • You use "I'm pretty sure" or "I kind of think" because of lack of confidence.
  • You discredit your achievements.

The Impostor Syndrome

The Impostor Syndrome

It is the feeling that you are not worthy of your designation, title, position or success.

Your accomplishments may be due to luck or effort, but you feel you lack the talent or skill ...

The Reality of Impostor Syndrome

  • The impostor syndrome is like a nagging feeling that our success might be due to luck, good timing, or even a computer error.
  • It makes us think we have done nothing, and that we secretly are a fraud for taking undue credit.
  • The person suffering from an impostor syndrome lives in fear that soon the 'secret' about his true nature will be uncovered.

Self-Efficacy is the Answer

The antidote to the impostor syndrome is self-efficacy, which is about learning one's own value.

Self-efficacy is described as a perceived ability to succeed at a particular task. It means having rock-solid confidence, a supercharged belief in your ability. 

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Trick your brain into calm

  • Become aware of your safety and breathing. Your fight or flight response may be in overdrive. 
  • Take note of five things you can see, four things you can hear, three ...

Using affirmations

Remind yourself how awesome you are with affirmations. Write down affirmations that remind you of your capabilities and strengths and keep them somewhere you can find them if nerves strike.

Another suggestion is to keep a file of praise, awards, and other evidence of how good you are at your job an read them when you are struggling with a confidence crisis.

Get clear about your feelings

Take a moment to really analyze what you’re feeling and strategize for that.

Can you reframe negative feelings, like fear, into something more positive, like anticipation? If not, remind yourself that it’s perfectly normal to be nervous before a high-stakes situation. 

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