Don't assume anything  - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

deepstash

Beta

7 Ways Amazing Leaders Encourage Healthy Debate

Don't assume anything 

Without a face or a voice to convey emotion, written text can easily be misconstrued as being terse, sarcastic, snarky, or even mean. 

Always assume you don’t know the tone of any written communication you receive and openly inquire as to the emotions of your debate partner.

79 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

7 Ways Amazing Leaders Encourage Healthy Debate

7 Ways Amazing Leaders Encourage Healthy Debate

https://www.inc.com/kevin-daum/7-ways-amazing-leaders-encourage-healthy-debate.html

inc.com

7

Key Ideas

The spirit of inquiry

Amazing leaders are not interested in winning for their own ego. They understand that finding the truth benefits the whole team so everyone can win. 

Open your mind and look for answers, not victory.

Don't assume anything 

Without a face or a voice to convey emotion, written text can easily be misconstrued as being terse, sarcastic, snarky, or even mean. 

Always assume you don’t know the tone of any written communication you receive and openly inquire as to the emotions of your debate partner.

Stating the desired outcome

Many people enter into a debate ready to battle with only one side knowing the rules and purpose of engagement. 

Before beginning any debate or argument, discuss with the other party a purposeful outcome and define clear rules of engagement.

Give the benefit of the doubt

If the emotions are high, debaters might assume that the other parties are against them.

Unless it's a life or death situation or your job is at stake, keep the emotion low and believe what the other party is communicating about their emotion and perspective. Keep the attacks on the facts.

Learning and winning

Amazing leaders see any small conflict like a cockroach in a slum wall — if one shows up, there must be many more behind the surface. 

When conflict arises unexpectedly, seize the opportunity to examine the circumstances and the underlying issues. You may find solutions that prevent huge systemic breakdowns or open you to massive new opportunities.

Treat others as comrades 

An office or business is a fascinating ecosystem that often combines unlikely people in high-pressure ways without concern for personality, style, or methodology. Everyone just assumes that people will find a way to get along. In reality, it takes effort on everyone's part.

Start every debate thinking of the other person as your best friend. Seek to help them understand and feel good about the engagement at the beginning, middle and end.

Being comfortable with the process

It’s okay to let things heat up during a debate, but you have to release the pressure after the battle or resentment will occur and build in an aggregated matter.

After a debate, you have the responsibility to make sure everyone is whole, even if it means you have to apologize for taking things too far for the circumstances. 

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Leadership and conflict go hand-in-hand

Conflict in the workplace is unavoidable. While you can try and avoid conflict (bad idea), you cannot escape conflict. 

The ability to recognize conflict, understand the nature of...

Unresolved conflict

 ... often results in loss of productivity, the stifling of creativity, and the creation of barriers to cooperation and collaboration.

Leaders who don’t deal with conflict will eventually watch their good talent walk out the door in search of a healthier and safer work environment.

2 Major causes of conflict
  1. Communication: Conflict due to the lack of information, poor information, no information, or misinformation. Clear, concise, accurate, and timely communication of information will help to ease both the number and severity of conflicts.
  2. Emotions: Letting emotions drive decisions. Don't place emotional superiority ahead of achieving your mission.

one more idea

Know your facts
How many times have you made a claim about some piece of trivia only to realize, as soon as you’ve made that claim, that you’re completely wrong?

Stop and think before you make such errors, and y...

Switch perspectives
Stepping into the mindset of those you argue with allows you to figure out what’s influencing them. 

Showing empathy will lower the temperature of the debate and allow both of you to come to a resolution.

Try to appear open-minded

If you appear to be giving the other side’s position a thoughtful review, then the solution you propose will seem to be far more sensible. Furthermore, your opponent may come to your side without you having to do anything other than listening.

3 more ideas

Effective communication

... is imperative for every successful business. Poor communication inevitably causes misunderstandings, confusion and conflicts that hinder productivity and professi...

Effective Communication is vital in business
  • It helps to create effective brand messaging.  It determines how your brand is perceived and also builds trust with customers.
  • Customer service relies on good communication. "60% of consumers have stopped doing business with a brand due to a poor customer service experience."  Microsoft’s 2016 Global State of Customer Service Report.
  • It enables positive team relationships.  Effective communication helps to unite teams and create a safe environment to express themselves.
  • It helps to prevent misunderstandings and conflicts. It can help to defuse a potentially explosive dispute while bad communication can set it off.

Worst Communication Mistakes
  1. Using a One-Size-Fits-All Communication Approach. Tailor the communication style to the intended audience.
  2. Speaking More and Listening Less. Listen to what is said, how it is said, and to what is not said.
  3. Assuming Instead of Asking More Questions.
  4. Using Negative Tone. Choose words carefully to eliminate negative reactions.
  5. Avoiding Difficult Conversations.

  6. Reacting, Not Responding.

  7. Not Keeping an Open Mind. Accept and respect differences, listen without judgment and consider all sides of an issue.

Know your brain

Our response to difficult conversations is neurologically the same response to fear: the fight, flight, or freeze response.

When you feel that internal escalation,&n...

Assume good intentions

When we are in conflict, our view of the other person becomes so narrow that we do not see them as a fleshed-out person. 

Try to assume that the other person is acting in good faith. That baseline assumption can get you through plenty of instances of misplaced tone and timing.  

Body language speaks volumes

Good communication is a full-body experience. It’s how we breathe. It’s our tone. It’s our gestures. 

Cultivate habits like keeping an open expression, avoid defaulting to crossed arms, and taking deep breaths to help change the tenor of an interaction.

3 more ideas

Humor at work
Humor at work

Being funny can have both positive and negative consequences, in your personal as well as your professional life. And context is always important: when making a joke, for instance, you should defin...

Humor and its effects on the status

Humor and status have always been tightly linked: good leaders seem to often use humor in order to motivate their team members' actions. As individuals, we tend to prefer, researchers claim, jokes that make us laugh while feeling slightly uncomfortable.

Furthermore, we perceive the joke teller as a self-confident person, who could easily become a leader due to his or her courage to make such a joke. The key point here is that the joke should be appropriate and match the context.

Inside jokes

Making inside jokes usually shows how bounded a team or a group is: their jokes can understood the best by themselves.

However, the moment an outsider integrates the group, it is better to avoid the inside jokes, as this will most probably make him or her feel out of place.

6 more ideas

Classic ways to handle conflict
  • Conflict management assumes that conflict is a constant feature of group life. The idea is to keep it within boundaries, not to eliminate it.
  • Conflict resolution sees con...
Conflict Transformation

A way to view conflict not as a problem to be managed or resolved,  but as an opportunity to strengthen the common life of any group.

Steps of Conflict Transformation
  1. View conflict as opportunity. Learn to see conflict as a valuable look beneath the surface of your organization.
  2. Respect your adversary. Pride is the primary obstacle to transforming conflict. 
  3. Identify primary issues. Always look beyond the presenting issue to name the real problem.
  4. Envision a shared future. Begin with the question “How can we create something better for both of us?”
  5. Know when to quit. If the other party is committed to being contentious, you may need to walk away—or at least maintain a holding pattern. 
  6. Capture the learning. Capture—and communicate—the lessons from the current conflict so they help you navigate a future one.
Ask questions

It helps you preserve your neutrality.
It is effective in getting others to pause, reflect, and get clear with themselves about what the problem actually is. 
You may get each ...

Be mindful during a conflict situation
  • All issues are best dealt with as soon as all involved are calm.
  • Start with one-on-one conversations to get the details of the issue from both perspectives.
  • Recognize that there is no objective reality of the situation.
Probing questions to ask

Once you have the basics of what happened and how long it has been going on, you can move on to asking more probing questions:

  • What is the other person saying?
  • How does what you've been hearing go against your values?
  • What is the difference between your two perspectives?
  • What aspects of this conflict do you believe you're responsible for?
  • Can you put yourself in your coworker's shoes? How does she feel?
  • If we were to think outside of the box, how could this issue be resolved?
  • What will happen to you if this issue isn't resolved through this discussion?
  • What would you offer to do or change to help resolve this issue? What would you like in return?
Interpersonal Issues

When it happens in the workplace, it can reduce productivity and make a dent in morale. 

It takes on the shape that one person, or a group of people, frustrates or hampers another person...

Types of Interpersonal Conflict
  • Policy Conflicts: disagreements about how to deal with a situation that affects both parties. 
  • Value Conflicts: they are typically pretty difficult to resolve because they are more ingrained.
  • Ego Conflicts: losing an argument, or being thought of as wrong, can actually damage a person’s self-esteem. This is like a power struggle.
What Causes Interpersonal Conflict
  • Frustration and stress
  • Misunderstandings
  • Lack of planning
  • Bad staff selection
  • Poor Communication

one more idea

1:1 meetings
1:1 meetings

1:1 meetings matter. It is important to nurture that essential employee-manager relationship. But it still not easy to get right.

Under pressures, managers are still juggl...

1:1 category

The goal of an effective 1:1 is not an update from your direct report or for you to lay down some instructions. It's a conversation. It's a chance to hear about your direct reports' ideas for your product, their career goals, and possibly their opinion of their performance.

Keep a list of three potential topics ready for discussion. When they say they have nothing to discuss, you can jumpstart the conversation with one of your items.

Manager's best tool

Your most precious resource is your own time and energy. When you spend it on your team, it helps build healthy relationships.

Your job as a manager isn't to give advice or 'save the day.'' It's to empower your reports to find the answer themselves. If you want to understand what's going on, ask. Let her lead the conversation while you listen and probe.

7 more ideas

A Team Needs Conflict

Overly nice people in the office, who never pick a fight, and value friendly relations with their peers and bosses, may be just as responsible for team dysfunction as the combative ones.

Conf...

Benefits Of Conflict

There is a need for conflict in teams for their effective functioning.

  • It allows team members to see difficult situations.
  • It helps put forward alternative solutions and diverse perspectives.
  • It acts as a strength test for the solutions found.
Healthy Conflicts

A nice person's self-image is based on pleasing and agreeing with others.

Instead of just agreeing and being nice, one should add unique value and perspective.

If you only agree with everyone, you may even not be that valuable to the team.

5 more ideas