Dealing People With Wrong Logic.

Dealing People With Wrong Logic.

It is always a challenge to deal with people who are illogical. You might identify them as illogical, but they may be unaware. Instead of getting emotional or angry about the situation, use your intellect to counter their faulty logic to get them back on track.

Once you feel like you are making headway in the conversation, gauge how successful the argument is by paying attention to the kind of response you get from your opponent – if they seem more open-minded then continue debating further, but if there is no change in their demeanor, move onto another topic.

3 STASHED

2 LIKES

Dealing People With Wrong Logic

dumblittleman.com

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

GET THE APP:

RELATED IDEAS

Premise 1: I can’t explain or imagine how proposition X can be true.

Premise 2: if a certain proposition is true, then I must be able to explain or imagine how that can be.

Conclusions: proposition X is false.

227 STASHED

1 LIKE

The Argument from Incredulity: How People Explain What They Don't Understand

effectiviology.com

Is a technique for developing our ability to listen, to make a conscious effort to understand what people are really saying.

As a communication technique, it is used in many professional settings (counseling, training, therapy) but is also valuable for everyday life.

474 STASHED

3 LIKES

Active Listening: The Master Key to Effective Communication

fs.blog

There are three different realms of an argument:

  • Head-based arguments are about the truth, based on facts and verifiable information.
  • Heart-based arguments are about meaning, personal taste and moral values.
  • Hand-based arguments are about usefulness and practicality.

Being able to distinguish between the three realms, and categorizing your argument stand can help you find common ground and end the argument in a productive way.

185 STASHED

1 LIKE

Learn to Argue Productively

nytimes.com