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Why There is No Such Thing as Time Management

“When the goal is merely to ‘get through’ the day as quickly as possible, life will pass full of regrets. Time becomes the great taskmaster when it should be the liberator. Time is endured rather than enjoyed.”

Benjamin Hardy

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Why There is No Such Thing as Time Management

Why There is No Such Thing as Time Management

https://medium.com/the-mission/why-there-is-no-such-thing-as-time-management-4d514a21060a

medium.com

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Key Ideas

“Most people have no clue what they are doing with their time but still complain that they don’t have enough.”

“Most people have no clue what they are doing with their time but still complain that they don’t have enough.”

Understanding time

You have all the time in the world if you know how to utilize the time you’re given.

There are no limits on time. You can complete as much work as you want — if you have the right mindset and environment

“If we do not create and control our environment, our environment creates and controls us.”

“If we do not create and control our environment, our environment creates and controls us.”

How successful people view time

The world’s most successful people give 100% of their time to whatever it is they are doing.

They are hyper-focused and relentlessly present with what’s directly in front of them: at work, at the gym, with their family.

“People are unhappy in large part because they are confused about what is valuable.” 

“People are unhappy in large part because they are confused about what is valuable.” 

Busyness

Most people prize “being busy.” They proclaim it with pride as if it’s a badge of honor.

But extremely successful people don’t tolerate busywork or distraction. Because most of the time "busyness" is nothing more than distraction and procrastination from what really matters.

Most people lack the confidence to go big. They prefer the dopamine boost of getting lots done, even if they aren’t making any progress.

Most people lack the confidence to go big. They prefer the dopamine boost of getting lots done, even if they aren’t making any progress.

Deep work

It means absolutely not tolerating distractions and producing monumental quality and quantity in a very short time. 

This is how you can complete far more with focused efforts than unfocused efforts with far more time.

“When you have less time available for work, you have to make better choices about what to work on (and what not to).”

“When you have less time available for work, you have to make better choices about what to work on (and what not to).”

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